Definitions

 

A

Absentee Rate

Maryland's absentee rate is the percentage of students absent from school for one or more days between the first day of the school year and the last day of the school year. The report card includes absentee rates for fewer than five days, more than 20 days, and chronically absent (see Accountability section for chronic absenteeism).

Academic Achievement Indicator

The academic achievement indicator consists of one measure: a performance composite on state assessments for English language arts and mathematics. The composite score will have four components:

  1. percentage of students scoring above a certain threshold on state English language arts assessments,
  2. percentage of students scoring above a certain threshold on state mathematics assessments,
  3. a performance index for English language arts assessments, and
  4. a performance index for mathematics assessments.

(See academic achievement indicator table.)

The academic achievement indicator accounts for 20% of the total accountability system score for elementary and middle schools; for high schools, the academic achievement indicator accounts for 30%.

Academic Achievement Indicator Table: Components
Component Description Points possible
Percentage of students scoring above a certain threshold on state English language arts assessments Percentage of students performing at the "met expectations" or "exceeded expectations" levels on the state English assessment or the equivalent on the MSAA (Multi-State Alternate Assessment) Elementary/Middle: 5

High: 7.5
Percentage of students scoring above a certain threshold on state mathematics assessments Percentage of students performing at the "met expectations" or "exceeded expectations" levels on the state mathematics assessment or the equivalent on the MSAA Elementary/Middle: 5

High: 7.5
Performance index for English language arts Performance index will equal the average of student performance levels on the state's English language arts assessment (including the equivalent score on the MSAA) Elementary/Middle: 5

High: 7.5
Performance index for mathematics Performance index will equal the average of student performance levels on the state's mathematics assessments (including the equivalent score on the MSAA) Elementary/Middle: 5

High: 7.5

For more information about the academic achievement indicator, visit: Maryland's Every Student Succeeds Act Plan

Academic Progress Indicator

The academic progress indicator is designed for elementary and middle schools only. The indicator is made up of two measures: Academic growth and credit for completion of a well-rounded curriculum (see the academic progress indicator table).

Academic growth
The academic growth measure is equal to the median student growth percentile (SGP) in English language arts and mathematics. The SGP is calculated as an individual student’s growth from one year to the next. That student’s growth is compared to other Maryland students who took the same assessment in the previous year and achieved a similar score. Because the SGP is calculated using two years of test scores, it can only be calculated for students in grades 4-8.

Credit for completion of a well-rounded curriculum
The completion of a well-rounded curriculum measure includes two components for elementary schools and three components for middle schools.

Elementary schools
The credit for completion of a well-rounded curriculum for elementary school includes two components:

Science achievement: The percentage of students scoring proficient on the Maryland Integrated Science Assessment (MISA)

Completion of 5th grade core coursework: The percentage of 5th graders passing one each of coursework in social studies, fine arts, physical education, and health

Middle schools
The credit for completion of a well-rounded curriculum for middle schools includes three components

Science achievement: The percentage of students scoring proficient on the Maryland Integrated Science Assessment (MISA)

Social studies achievement: The percentage of students scoring proficient on the Middle School Social Studies Assessment (MSSA) (The MSSA is expected to be included in Maryland's accountability system for the first time in school year 2020-21.)

Completion of 8th grade core coursework: The percentage of 8th grade students passing one of each coursework in mathematics, ELA, social studies, and science

The academic progress indicator will account for 35% of the total accountability system score for elementary and middle schools.

Academic Progress Indicator Table: Measures and components
Measure Component Description Points possible
Academic growth Student growth percentile Calculated as an individual student’s growth from one year to the next compared to other Maryland students who took the same assessment in the previous year and achieved a similar score Elementary/Midde: 25

High: 0
Credit for completion of a well-rounded curriculum Elementary Science achievement Percentage of students scoring proficient on the Maryland Integrated Science Assessment Elementary: 5

Middle/High: 0
Elementary Passing core coursework Percentage of 5th graders passing one each of coursework in social studies, fine arts, physical education, and health Elementary: 5

Middle/High: 0
Middle Science achievement Percentage of students scoring proficient on the Maryland Integrated Science Assessment Middle: 3.5

Elementary/High: 0
Middle Social studies achievement Percentage of students scoring proficient on the Middle School Social Studies Assessment Middle: 5

Elementary/High: 0
Middle Passing core coursework Percentage of 8th grade students passing one of each coursework in mathematics, ELA, social studies, and science Middle: 3

Elementary/High: 0

For more information about the academic progress indicator, visit: Maryland's Every Student Succeeds Act Plan

ACCESS for ELLs 2.0

The ACCESS for ELLs 2.0, designed by the WIDA Consortium, is given to 1st through 12th grade students who have been identified as English learners. The assessment measures student’s language in four areas: listening, reading, speaking, and writing.

For more information about ACCESS for ELLs 2.0, visit
Maryland Assessments
School Improvement in Maryland
WIDA ACCESS for ELLs 2.0

ACT

The ACT is an exam students take near the end of high school as they prepare to apply to college. Their score on the exam may help colleges determine if a student would be a good fit.

For more information about ACT, visit
ACT

Advanced Placement (AP)

High schools that participate in Advanced Placement (AP) offer students certified Advanced Placement courses and students may take Advanced Placement tests. Colleges and universities may allow students who score above a certain threshold on an AP test to earn college-level credit for that course.

For more information about the AP program, visit
Advanced Placement Program

Alternate Maryland Integrated Science Assessment (Alt-MISA)

The Alternate Maryland Integrated Science Assessment (Alt-MISA), also known as Dynamic Learning Maps (DLM), is designed for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities for whom the general education science assessment (MISA) is not appropriated, even with accommodations. The Alt-MISA is based on alternate achievement standards which have been derived from and are aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

For more information about the A;t-MISA assessments, visit
Maryland Assessments

Alternate Maryland School Assessment (ALT-MSA)

The Alternate Maryland School Assessment (ALT-MSA) is the Maryland assessment in which students with disabilities participate if through the IEP process it has been determined they cannot participate in the Maryland State Assessment (MSA) even with accommodations. The ALT-MSA assesses and reports student mastery of individually selected indicators and objectives from the reading, mathematics, and science content standards or appropriate access skills. A portfolio is constructed of evidence that documents individual student mastery of the assessed reading, mathematics, and science objectives.

Eligible students participate in the ALT-MSA in Grades 3-8 and 10.

The statewide performance standards reflecting three levels of achievement: Basic, Proficient, and Advanced are reported for the ALT-MSA.

AMOs for College- and Career-Readiness Indicator

The College- and Career-Readiness targets are calculated for the 5-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate and College and Career Preparation (CCP). The 5-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate targets are on a trajectory toward 2020, the time by which each individual school is expected to reduce its rate of non-graduating students by half. The CCP targets are on a trajectory toward 2017, the time by which each individual school is expected to reduce its percent of students that are not completing the CCP goals by half. CCP is a measurement of a student`s success in one of the following areas: Advance Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB), Career and Technology Education (CTE) Concentrators, and College Enrollment within 16 months of high school graduation. When a school`s baseline target is extraordinarily high (90 percent or higher for the 5-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate and 95 percent or higher for CCP), then the LEA level target or State level target (lowest of the two) will be used. The goal for the 5-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate is 95 percent; the goal for CCP is 100 percent.

5-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate:
All Students Base Yr + (((.95 - ((.95 - All Students Base Yr) / 2)) - All Students Base Yr) / 9)

CCP:
All Students Base Yr + (((1 - ((1 - All Students Base Yr) / 2)) - All Students Base Yr) / 6)

Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAOs)

Under the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) for Title III, Language Instruction for English Learners and Immigrant Students, states must conduct an annual statewide assessment of English learners (ELs), and local school systems are required to meet AMAOs for ELs from kindergarten through 12th grade. These AMAOs include:

  • increases in the number or percentage of children making progress in learning English (AMAO I);
  • increases in the number or percentage of children attaining English proficiency by the end of each school year (AMAO II); and
  • making progress toward School Progress on the AMO targets: student achievement and participation in reading and mathematics and graduation rate (AMAO III).

Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs)

Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs) are state established performance targets that assess the progress of student subgroups, schools, and each LEA.

Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB)

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is a timed multi-aptitude test. A participant's scores in Arithmetic Reasoning, Word Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, and Mathematics Knowledge make up their Armed Forces Qualifying Test (AFQT) score and determine if they are qualified to enlist in the military.

For more information about the ASVAB, visit:
ASVAB

Assessment Terms

Scale Score
The scale score is a representation of a student's actual test score. Maryland uses scale scores on its assessments to ensure one assessment score can be compared to another assessment score. Scales scores are then converted into proficiency levels.

For example, on the 2018 MISA, a student's actual test score of (x) equals a scale score of 761. The scale score fell within the range of 750-789 which means the student Met Expectations.

For more information about scale scores, visit
Maryland State Department of Education

Attendance Rate

Maryland's attendance rate represents the average daily attendance rate of students in grades 1-12, including special education students. The state’s proficient standard for attendance rate is 94% and the advanced standard is 96%.

Average Daily Attendance

The average daily attendance is calculated by dividing the total number of students in attendance by the total number of students registered to attend from the first day of school through April 13th.

B

Baseline or Starting Point

The No Child Left Behind Act defines the process of calculating the baseline or starting point for AYP. NCLB specifies that the state must establish a starting bar or measuring point for the percentage of students who must be at the proficient level, which may be based upon the lowest achieving schools (schools at the 20th percentile in the state) or lowest achieving demographic subgroup in the state, whichever is higher, or at a higher point.

C

Chronic absenteeism

The chronic absenteeism measure identifies the number of students who are expected to attend school for at least 10 days and who were absent 10% or more of the school days while enrolled at that school. For example, a student who is registered to attend a school for 30 days and who is absent 3 of those 30 days is considered chronically absent.

A student can be counted as chronically absent in multiple schools within the state in the same year. This can occur when a student who is enrolled for in a school for at least 10 days and is chronically absent moves and enrolls in another school for at least 10 days and is chronically absent.

The chronic absenteeism measure will account for 15% of the total accountability score for all schools.

Code 504 Students

Code 504 students are students who have a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, have a record of such an impairment, or are regarded as having such an impairment. In grades where state mandated testing occurs, Code 504 students are counted as exempt if their accommodation invalidates portions of the test.

Confidence Interval

Statistical procedures will be used in all tests of School Progress determinations to ensure that decisions take into account inherent measurement error present in all accountability systems. The confidence interval is a statistical tool used in Maryland School Progress determinations to ensure accurate and reliable accountability decisions. Because the accuracy of scores depends on the number of students in each group, the state uses a statistical test to help ensure that they make fair and valid School Progress decisions for groups with different numbers of students.

D

Dropout Rate: 4-Year Adjusted Cohort

The four–year adjusted cohort dropout rate is defined as the number of students who leave school, for any reason other than death, within the four year period divided by the number of students who form the adjusted cohort.

The school years are defined as the first day of the school year through the summer to the first day of the following school year. Student activity that occurs during the summer, including summer withdrawals, are included in the prior year`s data.

Figure 2: Four–Year Adjusted Cohort Dropout Rate Calculation

Four–Year Adjusted Cohort Dropout Rate

=

Dropouts


Adjusted Cohort

=

Students who terminate formal education for any reason other than death


(Number of First Time 9th Graders) +
(Students who transfer in) -
(Students who transfer out, emigrate, or die)
during the 4 year period

First Time 9th Graders are students who enter 9th grade for the first time and who are expected to graduate within four school years. Dropouts are any student who, for any reason other than death, leaves school before graduation or the completion of a Maryland–approved educational program (including a special education program) and is not known to enroll in another school or State–approved program.

Because the numerator includes multiple withdrawals and the denominator includes multiple re–entries across the course of the four–year period, the net result is that a student will count once, and only once, despite multiple withdrawals and reentries.

Dropout Rate: Annual

The percentage of students dropping out of school in grades 9 through 12 in a single year.The number and percentage of students who leave school for any reason, except death, before graduation or completion of a Maryland approved educational program and who are not known to enroll in another school or state-approved program during the current school year. The year is defined as July through June and includes students dropping out over the summer and students dropping out of evening high school and other alternative programs.

The dropout rate is computed by dividing the number of dropouts by the total number of students in grades 9 - 12 served by the school.

Note: Students who re-enter school during the same year in which they dropped out of school are not counted as dropouts.

Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.
Reported since November 1991: School.

E

English Language Arts

English is assessed in grades 3-8 and once in high school (English 10). Students may also take English assessments after completing English 9 and English 11. Students are measured in writing at every grade level because it is key to showing readiness for the next level of academic work and, in high school, readiness for college and career.

In these tests, students read passages from real fiction and non-fiction texts and sometimes watch video or listen to audio. They then respond, in writing, to a prompt; students use what they’ve learned from the passages and multi-media to support their arguments.

For more information about the English assessments, visit
Maryland Assessments
School Improvement in Maryland

English Language Proficiency Assessment

The English language proficiency assessment is administered to English learners (ELs) in grades K through 12 upon their entry into the school system (W-APT) and annually during a testing window in the second semester (ACCESS for ELLs 2.0®). The assessment measures a student's English language proficiency in the areas of listening/speaking (oral), reading/writing (literacy), and comprehension. English language proficiency is measured in six levels: entering, emerging, developing, expanding, bridging, and reaching.

The Alternate ACCESS for ELLs 2.0™ is designed for ELs with significant cognitive disabilities. In order to receive the most descriptive information from the test, it is very important that only students who meet all three criteria below and who cannot participate in the ACCESS for ELLs 2.0®—even with the provision of accommodations—shall be considered for the Alternate ACCESS for ELLs 2.0™.

Participation criteria:

  1. The student has been classified as an EL.
  2. The student has a significant cognitive disability and is eligible for special education services under IDEA.
  3. The student is in an alternate curriculum aligned with his or her state's academic standards, and is participating in the state's alternate accountability assessment.

The Alternate ACCESS for ELLs 2.0™; is available for the 1–2, 3–5, 6–8, and 9–12 grade clusters.

Enrollment

The number of students registered to attend a school as of September 30. The number includes ungraded special education and pre-kindergarten students.

For more on enrollment, visit:
Maryland State Department of Education

Entrants

Student entrants is the number of students transferring in to or re-entering a school during the September to June school year after the first day of school. A student moving from one school to another within the same school district as a result of promotion is not considered to be an entrant for mobility purposes unless the student entered school after the first day.

Entry Mobility

Entry mobility is the percentage of students entering a school during the school year. This type of mobility is calculated by dividing the number of entrants by the average daily membership.

Exit Mobility

Exit mobility is the percentage of withdrawing from a school during the school year. This type of mobility is calculated by dividing the number of withdrawals by the average daily membership.

F

Focus Schools

Focus Schools are 10 percent of all Title I schools having the largest gap between the “all students” subgroup and the lowest-performing subgroup or a Title I eligible high school with graduation rates 60 percent or lower. These schools are unique in that they do not require whole school reform measures, rather school interventions will focus on one or two subgroups that are low achieving and contribute to an increased achievement gap between other subgroups of students in the school. Focus schools will be expected to collect and analyze data to identify problematic areas of instruction and learning. This will allow schools and LEAs to address their identified areas of need through professional development, parental involvement, instructional teams, and the development of other specialized strategies that they deem necessary. These measures will be monitored by LEAs and MSDE to ensure that they effectively work to close the gaps between subgroups and all students within the school, thus improving the overall performance of the school. Focus Schools are identified every three years.

Free/Reduced Price Meals

The number and percentage of students whose applications for free/reduced price meals meet the family size and income guidelines (as promulgated annually by the U.S. Department of Agriculture) and students approved through direct certification. The counts are reported as of the student's last day of enrollment in the school system - either the last day in school or the date the student withdrew. The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of students receiving free or reduced price meals by the June net enrollment.

Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.
Reported since November 1991: School level.

Full Academic Year

Under School Progress, a school, school system, or the State is held accountable for the student performance of students who have been enrolled in the respective school, system, or state from September 30 through the dates of testing.

G

Grade 12 Documented Decisions

The Maryland State Department of Education collects pre-graduation plans data using the High School Graduate Follow-up Questionnaire. All graduating seniors indicate their post graduation decisions within 30 days of anticipated graduation.

Graduation Rate for School Progress

School Progress Graduation Rate Calculations

In 2008, the U. S. Department of Education directed each state to use a cohort graduation rate for reporting purposes beginning in 2011 and for accountability purposes in 2012. Maryland law requires the state to use the cohort graduation rate for School Progress determination in 2011.

The Maryland State Board of Education approved standards for the cohort graduation rate in 2011. Graduation rate is the “other academic indicator” used to determine School Progress for high schools. The standards adopted are:

  • Four-year cohort graduation rate: 81.5%
  • Five-year cohort graduation rate: 84.4%
  • 2020 four and five year cohort graduation rate goal: 95%

In 2012, the cohort graduation rate is measured for the all students group and each subgroup for School Progress at the state, school system, and school level. Maryland calculated targets utilizing the four-year and five-year cohort graduation rate by setting annual equal increments toward the goal (2020 95%) of reducing by half the percentage of non-graduate students in each subgroup. The targets are uniquely defined for each school, school system and the state depending upon the 2011 baseline for the four-year and five-year graduation rates.

The graduation rate AMO for 2012 can be achieved by following the progress of the cohort of students entering grade nine for the first time in fall 2007. The graduation rate AMO can be met using the following two-question process:

  1. Has the school, school system, or state achieved the Annual Measurable Objective (AMO) for the four-year cohort graduation rate for the student cohort entering grade nine for the first time in fall 2007 and graduating no later than 2012? If the rate is achieved the standard is met. If the standard is not met a second analysis (#2 below) is conducted.
  2. Has the school, school system, or state achieved the AMO for the five-year cohort graduation rate for the same cohort entering grade nine for the first time in fall 2007 graduating no later than 2012? If the five-year cohort graduation rate is achieved the standard is met, otherwise the standard is not met.

For further information on the calculation of the four and five year cohort graduation rate please see the Four-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate definition.

Graduation Rate Indicator

The graduation rate indicator is designed for high schools only. The indicator includes one measure, the graduation composite, and two components: the 4-year adjusted cohort graduation rate and the 5-year adjusted cohort graduation rate (see graduation rate indicator table).

4-year adjusted cohort graduation rate

The 4-year adjusted cohort graduation rate is the percentage of a school's cohort of first-time 9th grade students who graduate within four years, adjusted for students who transfer in and out of the cohort after 9th grade.

5-year adjusted cohort graduation rate

The 5-year adjusted cohort graduation rate is the percentage of a school’s cohort of first-time 9th grade students who graduate within five years, adjusted for students who transfer in and out of the cohort after 9th grade.

The graduation rate indicator will account for 15% of the total accountability score for high schools.

Graduation Rate Indicator Table: Components

Component Description Points possible
4-year adjusted cohort graduation rate Percentage of a school's cohort of first-time 9th grade students who graduate within four years, adjusted for students who transfer in and out of the cohort after 9th grade. High: 10

Elementary/Middle: 0
5-year adjusted cohort graduation rate Percentage of a school's cohort of first-time 9th grade students who graduate within five years adjusted for students who transfer in and out of the cohort after 9th grade. High: 5

Elementary/Middle: 0

For more information about the graduation rate indicator, visit: Maryland's Every Student Succeeds Act Plan

Graduation Rate: 3-Year Adjusted Cohort

The three-year adjusted cohort graduation rate is the number of students who graduate in three years with a regular high school diploma divided by the number of students who form the adjusted cohort for the graduating class. For any given cohort, students who are entering grade 9 for the first time form a cohort that is subsequently ”adjusted” by adding any students who transfer into the cohort later during the next two years and subtracting any students who transfer out, emigrates to another country, or dies during that same period. This definition is defined in federal regulation 34 C.F.R. §200.19(b) (1) (i)–(iv).

The three-year adjusted cohort graduation rate strictly adheres to section 1111(b) (2) (C) (vi) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which defines graduation rate as the ”percentage of students who graduate from secondary school with a regular diploma in the standard number of years.”

The three-year graduation rate is calculated by dividing the number of students who graduate within three years, including the summer following their third year of high school, with a regular high school diploma by the number of students who form the adjusted cohort for that graduating class. Students who drop out of high school remain in the adjusted cohort—that is, the denominator of the cohort graduation rate calculation.

The following formula provides an example of the three-year graduation rate for the cohort entering 9th grade for the first time in the fall of the 2006–2007 school year and graduating by the end of the 2008–2009 school year.

Three-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate
 

=
 

Number of cohort members who earned a regular high school diploma by the end of the 2008–2009 school year.


Number of first-time 9th graders in 2006–2007 school year (starting cohort) plus students who transfer in, minus students who transfer out, emigrate, or die during school years 2006–2007, 2007–2008, and 2008–2009.

To allow for sufficient time for all relevant data to be collected, aggregated and reported, the Three-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate is lagged. “Lag” refers to the delayed reporting of a given cohort. Maryland “lags” graduation rate for School Progress determinations.

Lagging the cohort rates provides a more complete picture. By lagging, the summer activities can be attributed to the more appropriate cohort. Additionally, the cohorts‛ fifth year activities can be used for School Progress determinations.

Three-year, four-year and five-year graduation rates included in School Progress determinations for 2010–2011
Rate First-time 9th graders Cohort population Regular high school diploma recipients
Three-year graduation rate 2006–2007 First-time 9th graders in 2006–2007 plus all students who transfer into the cohort minus students who transfer out, emigrate, or die by the summer following the end of the 2008–2009 school year. All students in the cohort population who receive a regular high school diploma within three years including the summer following the end of the 2008–2009 school year.
Four-year graduation rate 2006–2007 First-time 9th graders in 2006–2007 plus all students who transfer into the cohort minus students who transfer out, emigrate, or die by the summer following the end of the 2009–2010 school year. All students in the cohort population who receive a regular high school diploma within four years including the summer following the end of the 2009–2010 school year.
Five-year graduation rate 2006–2007 First-time 9th graders in 2006–2007 plus all students who transfer into the cohort minus students who transfer out, emigrate, or die by the end of the 2010–2011 school year. All students in the cohort population who receive a regular high school diploma within five years or less by the end of the 2010–2011 school year.

Graduation Rate: 4-Year Adjusted Cohort

The four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate is the number of students who graduate in four years with a regular high school diploma divided by the number of students who form the adjusted cohort for the graduating class. For any given cohort, students who are entering grade 9 for the first time form a cohort that is subsequently “adjusted” by adding any students who transfer into the cohort later during the next three years and subtracting any students who transfer out, emigrates to another country, or dies during that same period. This definition is defined in federal regulation 34 C.F.R. §200.19(b) (1) (i)-(iv).

The four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate strictly adheres to section 1111(b) (2) (C) (vi) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which defines graduation rate as the “percentage of students who graduate from secondary school with a regular diploma in the standard number of years.”

The four-year graduation rate is calculated by dividing the number of students who graduate within four years, including the summer following their fourth year of high school, with a regular high school diploma by the number of students who form the adjusted cohort for that graduating class. Students who drop out of high school remain in the adjusted cohort—that is, the denominator of the cohort graduation rate calculation.

The following formula provides an example of the four-year graduation rate for the cohort entering 9th grade for the first time in the fall of the 2006–2007 school year and graduating by the end of the 2009–2010 school year.

Four-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate
 

=
 

Number of cohort members who earned a regular high school diploma by the end of the 2009–2010 school year.


Number of first-time 9th graders in 2006–2007 school year (starting cohort) plus students who transfer in, minus students who transfer out, emigrate, or die during school years 2006–2007, 2007–2008, 2008–2009, and 2009–2010.

To allow for sufficient time for all relevant data to be collected, aggregated and reported, the Four-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate is lagged. “Lag” refers to the delayed reporting of a given cohort. Maryland “lags” graduation rate for School Progress determinations.

Lagging the cohort rates provides a more complete picture. By lagging, the summer activities can be attributed to the more appropriate cohort. Additionally, the cohorts‛ fifth year activities can be used for School Progress determinations.

Three-year, four-year and five-year graduation rates included in School Progress determinations for 2010–2011
Rate First-time 9th graders Cohort population Regular high school diploma recipients
Three-year graduation rate 2006–2007 First-time 9th graders in 2006–2007 plus all students who transfer into the cohort minus students who transfer out, emigrate, or die by the summer following the end of the 2008–2009 school year. All students in the cohort population who receive a regular high school diploma within three years including the summer following the end of the 2008–2009 school year.
Four-year graduation rate 2006–2007 First-time 9th graders in 2006–2007 plus all students who transfer into the cohort minus students who transfer out, emigrate, or die by the summer following the end of the 2009–2010 school year. All students in the cohort population who receive a regular high school diploma within four years including the summer following the end of the 2009–2010 school year.
Five-year graduation rate 2006–2007 First-time 9th graders in 2006–2007 plus all students who transfer into the cohort minus students who transfer out, emigrate, or die by the end of the 2010–2011 school year. All students in the cohort population who receive a regular high school diploma within five years or less by the end of the 2010–2011 school year.

Graduation Rate: 5-Year Adjusted Cohort

The five-year adjusted cohort graduation rate is the number of students who graduate in five years with a regular high school diploma divided by the number of students who form the adjusted cohort for the graduating class. For any given cohort, students who are entering grade 9 for the first time form a cohort that is subsequently ”adjusted” by adding any students who transfer into the cohort later during the next four years and subtracting any students who transfer out, emigrates to another country, or dies during that same period. This definition is defined in federal regulation 34 C.F.R. §200.19(b) (1) (i)–(iv).

The five-year adjusted cohort graduation rate strictly adheres to section 1111(b) (2) (C) (vi) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which defines graduation rate as the ”percentage of students who graduate from secondary school with a regular diploma in the standard number of years.”

The five-year graduation rate is calculated by dividing the number of students who graduate within five years, with a regular high school diploma by the number of students who form the adjusted cohort for that graduating class. Students who drop out of high school remain in the adjusted cohort—that is, the denominator of the cohort graduation rate calculation.

The following formula provides an example of the five-year graduation rate for the cohort entering 9th grade for the first time in the fall of the 2006–2007 school year and graduating by the end of the 2010–2011 school year.

Five-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate
 

=
 

Number of cohort members who earned a regular high school diploma by the end of the 2010–2011 school year.


Number of first-time 9th graders in 2006–2007 school year (starting cohort) plus students who transfer in, minus students who transfer out, emigrate, or die during school years 2006–2007, 2007–2008, 2008–2009, 2009–2010, and 2010–2011.

To allow for sufficient time for all relevant data to be collected, aggregated and reported, the Five-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate is lagged. “Lag” refers to the delayed reporting of a given cohort. Maryland “lags” graduation rate for School Progress determinations.

Lagging the cohort rates provides a more complete picture. By lagging, the summer activities can be attributed to the more appropriate cohort. Additionally, the cohorts‛ fifth year activities can be used for School Progress determinations.

Three-year, four-year and five-year graduation rates included in School Progress determinations for 2010–2011
Rate First-time 9th graders Cohort population Regular high school diploma recipients
Three-year graduation rate 2006–2007 First-time 9th graders in 2006–2007 plus all students who transfer into the cohort minus students who transfer out, emigrate, or die by the summer following the end of the 2008–2009 school year. All students in the cohort population who receive a regular high school diploma within three years including the summer following the end of the 2008–2009 school year.
Four-year graduation rate 2006–2007 First-time 9th graders in 2006–2007 plus all students who transfer into the cohort minus students who transfer out, emigrate, or die by the summer following the end of the 2009–2010 school year. All students in the cohort population who receive a regular high school diploma within four years including the summer following the end of the 2009–2010 school year.
Five-year graduation rate 2006–2007 First-time 9th graders in 2006–2007 plus all students who transfer into the cohort minus students who transfer out, emigrate, or die by the end of the 2010–2011 school year. All students in the cohort population who receive a regular high school diploma within five years or less by the end of the 2010–2011 school year.

Graduation Rate: Leaver

The percentage of students who received a Maryland high school diploma during the reported school year. This is an estimated cohort rate. It is calculated by dividing the number of high school graduates by the sum of the dropouts for grades 9 through 12, respectively, in consecutive years, plus the number of high school graduates.

The performance standard for graduation rate for School Progress is 90%.

H

High School Assessments (HSA)

The High School Assessments are end-of-course tests that students take as they complete the appropriate high school level course. All students including middle school students taking high school level courses, must take the High School Assessment after they complete the appropriate course. These courses currently include English, government, algebra/data analysis, and biology.

All students receive a score for each test they take. Scores are also reported for the state, school systems, and schools. The passing scale scores for all four of the content areas have been established. They are as follows:

Algebra 412
Biology 400
English 396
Government 394

Public Release Forms, sample test items, and additional information may be found on the School Improvement in Maryland Web site at http://mdk12.org/assessments/high_school/index_b.html, http://mdk12.org/assessments/high_school/index.html, and the Maryland State Department of Education Web site at http://www.msde.maryland.gov.

High School Program Completion: Course of Study

Course of Study reflects the percentage of students completing a rigorous course of study.

University of Maryland - The number and percentage of graduates who completed course requirements that would qualify them for admission to the University System of Maryland.

Career and Technology - The number and percentage of graduates who completed an approved Career and Technology Education program.

Both University and Career/Technology - The number and percentage of graduates who met both of the above requirements.

Rigorous High School Program - The percentage of graduates who mastered 4 of the 6 performance indicators:

  • Two or more credits in the same foreign language with a grade of B or better;
  • One or more credits in mathematics courses at a level higher than Algebra II and Geometry with a grade of B or better;
  • Four credits of science with a grade of B or better;
  • Two or more credits of approved advanced technology education with a grade of B or better;
  • A score of 1,000 or higher on SAT-1 or a score of 20 or higher on ACT, or both; and
  • A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale.

Course requirements for the admissions standards are set by the Board of Regents of the University System of Maryland. Ensuring the acceptability of each local system`s courses by the University System of Maryland is the responsibility of the individual school systems.

A list of approved Career and Technology Education programs is available from the Division of Career and Technology Education, MSDE, the approving agency.

The denominator is the number of graduates from the regular school year as well as any graduates from the preceding summer.

Highly Qualified Teachers

Classes taught throughout the school year, including summer school classes were reported. In addition, the elementary classes were weighted to account for all core academic subject instruction.

The federal "No Child Left Behind Act" (NCLB), enacted in January 2002, states that all teachers in core academic areas must be highly qualified in the core academic subjects they teach by the end of the 2005-2006 school year. It also requires that newly hired teachers in Title 1 programs or schools be highly qualified immediately. All teachers hired after the first day of the 2002-2003 school year in Title 1 schoolwide programs must be highly qualified. In Title 1 targeted-assistance schools, only those teachers paid with Title 1 funds need to be highly qualified immediately.

"Highly qualified" is a specific term defined by No Child Left Behind. The law outlines a list of minimum requirements both in content knowledge and teaching skills to meet the "highly qualified" status. The law requires teachers to have a bachelor`s degree and full state certification and to demonstrate content knowledge in the subjects they teach. Under NCLB states decide what is necessary for certification and for determining subject-matter competency. Rules surrounding the requirements for highly qualified teachers continue to be developed and refined. For more information on the state requirements please go to: www.msde.maryland.gov/MSDE/divisions/certification.

Under NCLB, states are required to measure the extent to which all students have highly qualified teachers. We have incorporated statistics on the percent of not highly qualified teachers in high poverty schools and in low poverty schools. This calculation is based on ranking schools by the percentage of economically disadvantaged students. Maryland uses students receiving free and reduced priced meals for this measure. MSDE reports the percentage of not highly qualified teachers in the highest and lowest quartiles of schools in this ranking.

I

Indicators

ESSA requires states receiving federal education funding establish indicators to measure student growth toward meeting the state’s long-term goals. Maryland’s ESSA plan includes indicators for the following areas: Academic achievement, academic progress, graduation rate, progress in achieving English language proficiency, school quality or student success, and readiness for postsecondary success.

Each indicator has a weight to ensure meaningful differentiation between all public schools in the state. The indicator table lists each indicator and weight in the accountability system. (Each indicator is discussed in greater detail below.)

ESSA Indicators
Indicator Weight for elementary and middle schools Weight for high schools
Academic Achievement Indicator 20% 30%
Academic Progress Indicator 35% -
Progress in Achieving English Language Proficiency 10% 10%
Graduation Rate Indicator - 15%
School Quality or Student Success 35% 35%
Readiness for Postsecondary Success - 10%
Total 100% 100%
Table reads: The Academic Achievement Indicator will make up 20% of the accountability system for elementary and middle schools. For high schools, the same indicator will be 30% of the accountability system.


International Baccalaureate (IB)

The International Baccalaureate program (IB) provides participating schools with curricular and instructional resources, tools, and support. IB-participating high schools may participate in a diploma program, in which students may earn an IB diploma by taking specific courses and passing a series of assessments and exams.

For more information about the IB program, visit
The Mid-Atlantic Association of IB World Schools

K

Kindergarten Readiness Assessment

The Kindergarten Readiness Assessment (KRA) is given to students entering kindergarten to measure their readiness to do kindergarten work. The KRA is a developmentally appropriate observational and assessment tool that relies on performance tasks and observations of children’s work and play to measure specific skills. The assessment is used to determine what each entering kindergartener knows and is able to do across four areas: language and literacy, mathematics, social foundations, and physical well-being and motor development.

For more information about the KRA, visit
Ready 4 Kindergarten

L

Length of School Day for Pupils

Average amount of time students were expected to be in attendance during a school day.

The length of the school day is defined as the amount of time to the nearest quarter hour between the first and final bell during a full school day for students.

Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.

Length of School Year for Pupils

The length of the September to June school year is defined as the number of days schools were open and students were expected to attend. Days when the schools were open for staff, but not expecting students, are excluded.

Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.

LEP Exempt Student

A State may exempt a recently arrived LEP student, from one administration of the State`s reading/language arts assessment. The State must report on the State and district report cards, the number of recently arrived LEP students who are not assessed on the State`s reading/language arts assessment.

A recently arrived LEP student is defined as a student with limited proficiency in English who attended schools in the United States for less than twelve months.

A State must assess the mathematics achievement of a recently arrived LEP student.

A State may include the scores of former LEP students as part of the LEP subgroup for the purpose of reporting School Progress at the State level.

Limited English Proficient

Special Services: LEP Program Participants

The number and percentage of students assessed as eligible for the Limited English Proficient (LEP) Program. LEP is also referred to as English as a Second Language (ESL).

LEP students have a primary or home language other than English and have been assessed as having limited or no ability to understand, speak, read, or write English. The counts are reported as of the student's last day of enrollment in the school system - either the last day in school or the date the student withdrew. The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of LEP students by the June net enrollment.

Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.
Reported since November 1991: School level.

LEP Exempt

Limited English Proficient students, during their first year of enrollment in U.S. schools, have the option of taking or not taking (exempt from) the state reading assessment. LEP students also have the option of taking or not taking (exempt from) the state mathematics assessment with accommodations as appropriate. States can but are not required to include these results in Adequate Yearly Progress. Students would be counted as participants for Adequate Yearly Progress purposes for the 95 percent testing requirement.

Redesignated Limited English Proficient (R-LEP)

These are students that exit the LEP subgroup once they attain English language proficiency. For Adequate Yearly Progress calculations, states have two years to include in the LEP subgroup students who have attained English proficiency.

M

Maryland Comprehensive Assessment Program (MCAP) and Other Assessments

Maryland Comprehensive Assessment Program (MCAP) and Other Assessments

The Maryland Comprehensive Assessment Program (MCAP) provides information that helps Maryland schools strengthen instruction and improve student performance so that high school graduates are ready to move into the workforce or a postsecondary education.

The Maryland Comprehensive Assessment Program (MCAP) includes all Maryland state assessments. In 2018, Maryland administered:

All state-administered assessments are part of Maryland's ESSA plan. There are other assessments that are included in the plan that Maryland does not oversee. These assessments include ACT, Advanced Placement, ASVAB, International Baccalaureate, and SAT.

Maryland Public College Credit

The number and percentage of students enrolled in a Maryland Public College within 16 months of high school graduation and completed one year of college credit within 24 months enrollment. One year of college credit is defined as 30 credits.

Maryland Public College Enrollment

The number and percentage of Maryland graduating students that received a Maryland Diploma and enrolled in a Maryland Public College within 16 months of high school graduation. The numerator data source is the Maryland Higher Education Commission. The denominator is the number of graduates from the regular school year as well as any graduates that complete their program of study in the summer that follows.

Maryland School Assessment (MSA)

The Maryland School Assessment (MSA) requires students in grades 3 through 8 to demonstrate what they know about reading, math, and science. The MSA test measures basic as well as higher level skills. For 2009, the performance results for MSA include both MSA and MOD-MSA students for grades 6-8.

The MSA test produces a score that describes how well a student masters the reading, math, and science content specified in the Maryland Content Standards. Each child will receive a score in each content area that will categorize their performance as basic, proficient, or advanced.

This test, which has replaced the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP), provides educators, parents, and the public valuable information about student, school, school system, and state performance.

Mathematics

Math is assessed in grades 3-8 and once in high school (Algebra I). Students may also take a math end-of-course assessment after completing Geometry or Algebra II.

In these tests, students solve multi-step math problems that require reasoning and address real-world situations. This requires students to reason mathematically, make sense of quantities and their relationship to solve real-world problems, and show their understanding.

For more information about the mathmatics assessment, visit
Maryland Assessments
School Improvement in Maryland

Migrant Students

Migrant students are students whose parents or guardians are migratory agricultural workers (including dairy and fishing workers) and who, in the preceding 36 months, have moved from one school district to another to accompany their parents or guardians. Maryland does not have a large enough migrant student population to report meaningful assessment results.

Mobility

Mobility refers to the movement of students from one school to another during the school year. Three types of mobility are calculated using student entrants and student withdrawals: Total student mobility, entry mobility, and exit mobility.

Multi-State Alternate Assessment (MSAA)

If, through the Individual Education Plan (IEP) process, it is determined that a student cannot participate in Maryland’s general education English and math assessments, even with accommodations, then that student would participate in the Multi-State Alternate Assessment (MSAA). The MSSA assesses and reports student mastery of individually selected indicators and objectives from the English language arts and mathematics content standards or appropriate access skills.

A portfolio is constructed of evidence that documents individual student mastery of the assessed English language arts and mathematics objectives.

Eligible students participate in the MSAA in Grades 3-8 and 11

For more information about MSSA, visit
School Improvement in Maryland
Maryland Assessments

N

NAEP Achievement Level Standards for Mathematics Grade 4

Basic
Fourth-graders performing at the Basic level should be able to estimate and use basic facts to perform simple computations with whole numbers, show some understanding of fractions and decimals, and solve some simple real-world problems in all NAEP content areas. Students at this level should be able to use—though not always accurately—four-function calculators, rulers, and geometric shapes. Their written responses will often be minimal and presented without supporting information.
Proficient
Fourth-graders performing at the Proficient level should be able to use whole numbers to estimate, compute, and determine whether results are reasonable. They should have a conceptual understanding of fractions and decimals; be able to solve real-world problems in all NAEP content areas; and use four-function calculators, rulers, and geometric shapes appropriately. Students performing at the Proficient level should employ problem-solving strategies such as identifying and using appropriate information. Their written solutions should be organized and presented both with supporting information and explanations of how they were achieved.
Advanced
Fourth-graders performing at the Advanced level should be able to solve complex and nonroutine real-world problems in all NAEP content areas. They should display mastery in the use of four-function calculators, rulers, and geometric shapes. The students are expected to draw logical conclusions and justify answers and solution processes by explaining why, as well as how, they were achieved. They should go beyond the obvious in their interpretations and be able to communicate their thoughts clearly and concisely.

NAEP Achievement Level Standards for Mathematics Grade 8

Basic
Eighth-graders performing at the Basic level should complete problems correctly with the help of structural prompts such as diagrams, charts, and graphs. They should be able to solve problems in all NAEP content areas through the appropriate selection and use of strategies and technological tools—including calculators, computers, and geometric shapes. Students at this level also should be able to use fundamental algebraic and informal geometric concepts in problem solving.

As they approach the Proficient level, students at the Basic level should be able to determine which of the available data are necessary and sufficient for correct solutions and use them in problem solving. However, these eighth-graders show limited skill in communicating mathematically.
Proficient
Eighth-graders performing at the Proficient level should be able to conjecture, defend their ideas, and give supporting examples. They should understand the connections between fractions, percents, decimals, and other mathematical topics such as algebra and functions. Students at this level are expected to have a thorough understanding of Basic level arithmetic operations—an understanding sufficient for problem solving in practical situations.

Quantity and spatial relationships in problem solving and reasoning should be familiar to them, and they should be able to convey underlying reasoning skills beyond the level of arithmetic. They should be able to compare and contrast mathematical ideas and generate their own examples. These students should make inferences from data and graphs, apply properties of informal geometry, and accurately use the tools of technology. Students at this level should understand the process of gathering and organizing data and be able to calculate, evaluate, and communicate results within the domain of statistics and probability.
Advanced
Eighth-graders performing at the Advanced level should be able to probe examples and counterexamples in order to shape generalizations from which they can develop models. Eighth-graders performing at the Advanced level should use number sense and geometric awareness to consider the reasonableness of an answer. They are expected to use abstract thinking to create unique problem-solving techniques and explain the reasoning processes underlying their conclusions.

NAEP Achievement Level Standards for Reading Grade 4

Basic
Fourth-grade students performing at the Basic level should demonstrate an understanding of the overall meaning of what they read. When reading text appropriate for fourth-graders, they should be able to make relatively obvious connections between the text and their own experiences and extend the ideas in the text by making simple inferences.
Proficient
Fourth-grade students performing at the Proficient level should be able to demonstrate an overall understanding of the text, providing inferential as well as literal information. When reading text appropriate to fourth grade, they should be able to extend the ideas in the text by making inferences, drawing conclusions, and making connections to their own experiences. The connection between the text and what the student infers should be clear.
Advanced
Fourth-grade students performing at the Advanced level should be able to generalize about topics in the reading selection and demonstrate an awareness of how authors compose and use literary devices. When reading text appropriate to fourth grade, they should be able to judge text critically and, in general, to give thorough answers that indicate careful thought.

NAEP Achievement Level Standards for Reading Grade 8

Basic
Eighth-grade students performing at the Basic level should be able to locate information; identify statements of main idea, theme, or author`s purpose; and make simple inferences from texts. They should be able to interpret the meaning of a word as it is used in the text. Students performing at this level should also be able to state judgments and give some support about content and presentation of content.
Proficient
Eighth-grade students performing at the Proficient level should be able to provide relevant information and summarize main ideas and themes. They should be able to make and support inferences about a text, connect parts of a text, and analyze text features. Students performing at this level should also be able to fully substantiate judgments about content and presentation of content.
Advanced
Eighth-grade students performing at the Advanced level should be able to make connections within and across texts and to explain causal relations. They should be able to evaluate and justify the strength of supporting evidence and the quality of an author`s presentation. Students performing at the Advanced level also should be able to manage the processing demands of analysis and evaluation by stating, explaining, and justifying.

NAEP Achievement Level Standards for Science Grade 8

Basic
Students performing at the Basic level should be able to state or recognize correct science principles. They should be able to explain and predict observations of natural phenomena at multiple scales, from microscopic to global. They should be able to describe properties and common physical and chemical changes in materials; describe changes in potential and kinetic energy of moving objects; describe levels of organization of living systems—cells, multicellular organisms, and ecosystems; identify related organisms based on hereditary traits; describe a model of the solar system; and describe the processes of the water cycle. They should be able to design observational and experimental investigations employing appropriate tools for measuring variables. They should be able to propose and critique the scientific validity of alternative individual and local community responses to design problems.
Proficient
Students performing at the Proficient level should be able to demonstrate relationships among closely related science principles. They should be able to identify evidence of chemical changes; explain and predict motions of objects using positiontime graphs; explain metabolism, growth, and reproduction in cells, organisms, and ecosystems; use observations of the Sun, Earth, and Moon to explain visible motions in the sky; and predict surface and ground water movements in different regions of the world. They should be able to explain and predict observations of phenomena at multiple scales, from microscopic to macroscopic and local to global, and to suggest examples of observations that illustrate a science principle. They should be able to use evidence from investigations in arguments that accept, revise, or reject scientific models. They should be able to use scientific criteria to propose and critique alternative individual and local community responses to design problems.
Advanced
Students performing at the Advanced level should be able to develop alternative representations of science principles and explanations of observations. They should be able to use information from the periodic table to compare families of elements; explain changes of state in terms of energy flow; trace matter and energy through living systems at multiple scales; predict changes in populations through natural selection and reproduction; use lithospheric plate movement to explain geological phenomena; and identify relationships among regional weather and atmospheric and ocean circulation patterns. They should be able to design and critique investigations involving sampling processes, data quality review processes, and control of variables. They should be able to propose and critique alternative solutions that reflect science-based trade-offs for addressing local and regional problems.

NAEP Participation/Inclusion

NAEP assesses a representative sample of all students selected as a part of its sampling process. In all NAEP schools, accommodations are provided as necessary for students with disabilities (SD) and English language learners (ELL).The accommodations are available to students whose Individualized Education Program (IEP) specifically requires them. Because some ELL students do not have an IEP, decisions about accommodations for these students are typically made by knowledgeable school staff.

The NAEP program has established procedures to include as many students with disabilities (SD) and English language learners (ELLs) as possible in the assessments. School staff make the decisions about whether to include an SD or ELL student in a NAEP assessment, and which testing accommodations, if any, they should receive.

School staff who are familiar with these students are asked a series of questions to help them decide whether each student should participate in the assessment and whether the student needs accommodations.

Inclusion in NAEP of an SD or ELL student is encouraged if that student (a) participated in the regular state academic assessment in the subject being tested, and (b) if that student can participate in NAEP with the accommodations NAEP allows. Even if the student did not participate in the regular state assessment, or if he/she needs accommodations NAEP does not allow, school staff are asked whether that student could participate in NAEP with the allowable accommodations.

A listing of the accommodations allowed on NAEP are presented below.

Accommodations for Students with Disabilities Math Reading Science
Has directions read aloud/repeated in English or receives assistance to understand directions1 yesyesyes
Has directions only signedyesyesyes
Has test items signedyesnoyes
Has occasional words or phrases read aloudyesnoyes
Has all or most of the test materials read aloudyesnoyes
Uses a Braille version of the testyesyesyes
Uses a large-print version of the testyesyesyes
Uses magnifying equipmentyesyesyes
Responds in sign languageyesyesyes
Uses a Braille typewriter to respondyesyesyes
Points to answers or responds orally to a scribeyesyesyes
Tape records answersnonono
Uses a computer or typewriter to respond—no spell/grammar check allowedyesyesyes
Uses a template to respondyesyesyes
Uses large marking pen or special writing toolyesyesyes
Writes directly in test booklet1yesyesyes
Takes the test in small group (5 or fewer)yesyesyes
Takes the test one-on-oneyesyesyes
Takes the test in a study carrelyesyesyes
Receives preferential seating, special lighting, or furnitureyesyesyes
Has test administered by a familiar personyesyesyes
Receives extended timeyesyesyes
Is given breaks during the testyesyesyes
Takes test session over several daysnonono
Uses a calculator, including talking or Braille calculator, for computation tasksnonono
Uses an abacus, arithmetic tables, graph papernonono
Uses dictionary, thesaurus, or spelling and grammar-checking software or devicesnonono

Accommodations for English Language Learners Math Reading Science
Has directions read aloud/repeated in English or receives assistance to understand directions1yesyesyes
Has directions only read aloud in native languageyesnoyes
Has test materials read aloud in native languageyesnoyes
Uses a bilingual version of the booklet (Spanish/English only)yesnoyes
Uses a bilingual word-for-word dictionary without definitionsyesnoyes
Has occasional words or phrases read aloud in Englishyesnoyes
Has all or most of the test materials read aloud in Englishyesnoyes
Has oral or written responses in native language translated into written Englishnonono
Takes the test in small group (5 or fewer)yesyesyes
Takes the test one-on-oneyesyesyes
Receives preferential seatingyesyesyes
Has test administered by familiar personyesyesyes
Receives extended timeyesyesyes
Is given breaks during the testyesyesyes
Takes test session over several daysnonono

1: Accommodations that are standard NAEP practice, and so are not considered as accommodations.

NAEP allows most accommodations students receive on the Maryland state tests with the exception of the following:

NAEP DOES NOT ALLOW:

  • Test questions read aloud (verbatim reading) or signed for the reading assessment.
  • Tests taken over several days.
  • The use of a calculator for computation tasks in a booklet or section that does not require one including talking or Braille calculators.
  • The use of a dictionary, thesaurus, or spelling and grammar checking software or devices.
  • Some visual organizers such as graph paper or templates.

National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is a nationally representative assessment that measures what students know and can do in mathematics and reading. NAEP is administered every other year to a sample of Maryland's 4th and 8th grade students. The data collected from NAEP produces state-level information that can be used for state-to-state comparisons and state-to-nation comparisons, but it does produce district- or school-specific information (with the exception of Baltimore City, which participated in NAEP's Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) since 2009).

For more information about NAEP, visit
NAEP overview
NAEP participant selection
NAEP inclusion policy
NAEP TUDA

Nationwide College Enrollment

The number and percentage of Maryland graduating students that received a Maryland Diploma and enrolled in a Nationwide public or non-public college within 12, 16 or 24 months of high school graduation. The numerator data source is the National Student Clearinghouse. The denominator is the number of graduates from the regular school year as well as any graduates that complete their program of study in the summer that follows.

O

Other Academic Indicators for School Progress

School progress requires schools to show improvement in one other academic indicator in addition to test scores. This academic measure, determined by the state, is measured separately in the School Progress calculation. The academic indicator is graduation rate for high schools that is measured for all subgroups. The attendance rate is measured for the all students subgroup for elementary and middle schools.

P

Participation Rate For School Progress

A 95% participation rate is required. The participation rate calculation is based on the number of students enrolled during the testing window. Beginning with the baseline year of 2010-2011, Maryland’s new accountability program ensures 100% participation by including all enrolled students, even absent students, in School Progress calculations. This was achieved by assigning a "basic" performance level to any student absent for the primary and makeup test administrations. Maryland's method for checking and ensuring a 95% participation rate remains unchanged. Participation rate is computed for each subgroup, and in the aggregate, for each of the reading and mathematics assessments by dividing the number of enrolled students in each testing group by the number of enrolled students in that group. The participation rate is calculated for each subgroup and for the aggregate separately in each of reading and mathematics assessments where a group includes at least:

  1. 30 students for schools with one grade tested,
  2. 60 students for schools with two or more grades tested, or
  3. 60 students for school systems.

    1. Groups not meeting the minimum criteria listed are not checked for participation rate. (Please note the minimum group size (N) for checking performance has not changed; it remains 5.)

      Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC)

      In 2014 most Maryland public schools had some students who participated in MSA and some students who participated in the PARCC field test. PARCC performance data is not reported because test items are being field tested. Therefore, reading and/or mathematics proficiency data is not reported in the grades for those schools that field tested in those contents. The participation rate data is reported for both MSA and for PARCC on School Progress.

      The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) is a consortium of 12 states plus the District of Columbia working together to develop a common set of K-12 assessments in English and math anchored in what it takes to be ready for college and careers. These new K-12 assessments will build a pathway to college and career readiness by the end of high school, mark students’ progress toward this goal from 3rd grade up, and provide teachers with timely information to inform instruction and provide student support. The PARCC assessments will be ready for states to administer during the 2014-15 school year.

      Per Pupil Expenditures

      Funds spent on public education in relation to the number of students enrolled in school.

      An expenditure is defined as money spent on:

      • Administration
      • Instruction
      • Special Education
      • Student Personnel Services
      • Student Transportation
      • Health Services
      • Operations of Physical Plant
      • Maintenance of Physical Plant
      • Fixed Charges (including the state’s share of teachers’ retirement and social security)

      Expenditures for equipment, transfers, and adult education are excluded. Data are based on the previous year’s financial information included in the Annual Financial Report. The denominator is the September 30 equated enrollment.

      Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.

      Per Pupil Staffing

      1. Instructional Staff per 1,000 pupils.
      2. Professional Support Staff per 1,000 pupils.
      3. Instructional Assistants per 1,000 pupils.

      All staff are reported in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE) positions. That is, the time required to perform a part-time assignment divided by the time required in a corresponding full-time position.

      1. Instructional Staff perform professional activities related to teaching students either in a classroom setting or other location. Included are classroom, resource, home and hospital teachers.
         
      2. Professional Support Staff provide auxiliary services to students or to the instructional program at the school level. Included are media specialists, guidance counselors, school psychologists, therapists, principals, assistant principals, and administrative assistants.
         
      3. Instructional Assistants assist a teacher with routine activities such as monitoring students, conducting rote exercises, operating equipment, and performing clerical duties. Included are regular program, special education, Title I, and library assistants.
         

      The denominator for each category of staff is the September 30 equated enrollment. Half-day pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students are counted as 0.5 in the total enrollment count.

      Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.

      Per Pupil Wealth

      Taxable Wealth in relation to the September 30 enrollment of a school district.

      Wealth is defined in The Code of Maryland Regulations COMAR Section 5-202 as the sum of a county`s net taxable income, the assessed value of real property, and fifty percent of the assessed value of personal property. The denominator is the September 30 equated enrollment.

      Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.

      Performance Level Standards for ALT-MSA

      Standards are measures of performance against which yearly results are compared. Standards help to examine critical aspects of instructional programs; help to ensure that all students receive quality instruction; hold educators accountable for quality instruction; and help to guide efforts toward school improvement.

      Maryland School Performance Program (MSPP) performance standards were determined through deliberative processes by educators with involvement of critical stakeholders such as the legislators and members of the business community. The State Board of Education adopted all standards.

      The purpose of the MSPP standards is to:

      • provide statewide equity and quality assurance in terms of student outcomes;
      • establish a mechanism for instructional accountability useful to schools, school systems, and the state;
      • stimulate self-examination and appropriate action by local district staff and the Maryland State Department of Education; and
      • set improvement expectations that guide school and school system objectives, decision, and efforts.

      Maryland standards are divided into three levels of achievement: Advanced, Proficient, and Basic.

      ALT-MSA Performance Level Descriptors

      • Advanced Students at this level demonstrate 90% or greater attainment of their identified mastery objectives in reading and mathematics (attainment of 9 or 10 of the student`s Mastery Objectives in a given content area).
      • Proficient Students at this level demonstrate at least 60% but less than 90% attainment of their identified mastery objectives in reading and mathematics (attainment of 6 to 8 of the student`s Mastery Objectives in a given content area). The goal for all students is to reach the proficient or advanced level.
      • Basic Students at this level demonstrate 0% to less then 60% attainment of their identified mastery objectives in reading and mathematics. (attainment of up to 5 of the student`s Mastery Objectives in a given content area).

      Other Performance Level Standards

      Performance Level Standards for MSA
      Performance Level Standards for MOD-MSA

      Standards for the MFTs, Attendance Rate, and Dropout Rate were adopted in 1990.

      Performance Level Standards for MOD-MSA

      Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year the Mod-MSA was discontinued and those students are taking the MSA.

      Standards are measures of performance against which yearly results are compared. Standards help to examine critical aspects of instructional programs; help to ensure that all students receive quality instruction; hold educators accountable for quality instruction; and help to guide efforts toward school improvement.

      Maryland School Performance Program (MSPP) performance standards were determined through deliberative processes by educators with involvement of critical stakeholders such as the legislators and members of the business community. The State Board of Education adopted all standards.

      The purpose of the MSPP standards is to:

      • provide statewide equity and quality assurance in terms of student outcomes;
      • establish a mechanism for instructional accountability useful to schools, school systems, and the state;
      • stimulate self-examination and appropriate action by local district staff and the Maryland State Department of Education; and
      • set improvement expectations that guide school and school system objectives, decision, and efforts.

      Maryland standards are divided into three levels of achievement: Advanced, Proficient, and Basic.

      MOD-MSA Reading Performance Level Descriptors

      • Advanced Students at this level can regularly read above grade-level text and demonstrate the ability to comprehend complex literature and informational passages. Students were provided supports which included test items having fewer answer choices, test items with language (other than required Reading terminology) which was simplified, stimulus material which was shorter, and test items which had information not essential to the content removed.
      • Proficient Students at this level can read grade appropriate text and demonstrate the ability to comprehend literature and informational passages. The goal for all students is to reach the proficient or advanced level. Students were provided supports which included test items having fewer answer choices, test items with language (other than required Reading terminology) which was simplified, stimulus material which was shorter, and test items which had information not essential to the content removed.
      • Basic Students at this level are unable to adequately read and comprehend grade appropriate literature and informational passages. Students were provided supports which included test items having fewer answer choices, test items with language (other than required Reading terminology) which was simplified, stimulus material which was shorter, and test items which had information not essential to the content removed.

      MOD-MSA Mathematics Performance Level Descriptors

      • Advanced Students at this level can regularly solve complex problems in mathematics and demonstrate superior ability to reason mathematically. Students were provided supports which included test items having fewer answer choices, test items with language (other than required Mathematics terminology) which was simplified, stimulus material which was shorter, and test items which had information not essential to the content removed.
      • Proficient Students at this level demonstrate an understanding of fundamental grade level skills and concepts and can generally solve entry-level problems in mathematics. Students were provided supports which included test items having fewer answer choices, test items with language (other than required Mathematics terminology) which was simplified, stimulus material which was shorter, and test items which had information not essential to the content removed.
      • Basic Students at this level demonstrate only partial mastery of the skills and concepts defined in the Maryland Mathematics Content Standards.Students were provided supports which included test items having fewer answer choices, test items with language (other than required Mathematics terminology) which was simplified, stimulus material which was shorter, and test items which had information not essential to the content removed.

      Other Performance Level Standards

      Performance Level Standards for ALT-MSA
      Performance Level Standards for MSA

      Standards for the MFTs, Attendance Rate, and Dropout Rate were adopted in 1990.

      Performance Level Standards for MSA

      Standards are measures of performance against which yearly results are compared. Standards help to examine critical aspects of instructional programs; help to ensure that all students receive quality instruction; hold educators accountable for quality instruction; and help to guide efforts toward school improvement.

      Maryland School Performance Program (MSPP) performance standards were determined through deliberative processes by educators with involvement of critical stakeholders such as the legislators and members of the business community. The State Board of Education adopted all standards.

      The purpose of the MSPP standards is to:

      • provide statewide equity and quality assurance in terms of student outcomes;
      • establish a mechanism for instructional accountability useful to schools, school systems, and the state;
      • stimulate self-examination and appropriate action by local district staff and the Maryland State Department of Education; and
      • set improvement expectations that guide school and school system objectives, decision, and efforts.

      Maryland MSA standards are divided into three levels of achievement:

      • Advanced is a highly challenging and exemplary level of achievement indicating outstanding accomplishment in meeting the needs of students.
      • Proficient is a realistic and rigorous level of achievement indicating proficiency in meeting the needs of students.
      • Basic is a level of achievement indicating that more work is needed to attain proficiency in meeting the needs of students.

      MSA Performance Level Descriptor

      MSA Performance Level Standards for Reading Grade 3

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • use context clues to determine appropriate meanings of words and commonly used expressions
      • identify information and details directly stated in a text
      • draw simple inferences from grade-appropriate text
      • identify basic characteristics of a literary genre
      • use appropriate prior knowledge to make simple inferences about information in a text
      • use sufficient textual evidence to support or explain an idea or inference about a text
      • identify or state a main idea of an informational text
      • identify or state a theme of a literary text
      • use graphic aids to help construct meaning from a text

      Proficient

      What proficient students likely can do that basic students likely cannot do:
      What proficient students likely cannot do:
      • identify a stated or implied main idea of an informational passage
      • identify a theme or lesson learned in a literary text
      • support simple inferences or ideas about a text with appropriate textual evidence
      • use graphic aids to help construct meaning from a text
      • synthesize information to arrive at generalizations, conclusions, and complex inferences
      • use textual evidence effectively to explain ideas
      • analyze a text to uncover its complexities

      Advanced

      What advanced students likely can do that proficient students likely cannot do:
      • discriminate between details/information and the ideas they express
      • synthesize information and details to arrive at generalizations, conclusions, and complex inferences
      • analyze a text to uncover its complexities use evidence from a text effectively to explain conclusions and inferences
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Reading Grade 4

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • draw simple inferences from grade-appropriate text
      • identify information directly stated in a text
      • use context clues to determine appropriate meanings of words
      • identify the main idea of a text when that idea is obvious
      • make connections to the real world and the text by accessing prior knowledge
      • respond in writing to questions about a text with minimal textual evidence
      • support ideas about a text with adequate text-relevant information or evidence
      • infer a main idea from a text
      • use knowledge of literary elements to make meaning

      Proficient

      What proficient students likely can do that basic students likely cannot do:
      What proficient students likely cannot do:
      • use context clues to determine appropriate meanings of words
      • recognize the relationship between text features and ideas or information in a text
      • support a literal reading of a text with text-relevant information
      • support simple inferences or general ideas about a text with appropriate textual evidence
      • apply knowledge of literary elements (e.g., character, main conflict) when making meaning from a text
      • explain complexities of a text
      • clarify and extend ideas in a text with specific, effective text-relevant information
      • consistently make connections among ideas in a text
      • exhibit a reading of a text beyond the literal

      Advanced

      What advanced students likely can do that proficient students likely cannot do:
      • analyze a text to uncover its complexities
      • clarify and extend ideas in a text with specific, effective text-relevant information or evidence
      • use relationships among ideas in a text to draw conclusions and make generalizations
      • articulate conclusions about author's craft
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Reading Grade 5

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • understand basic literary elements (e.g., character, simple plot, conflict)
      • make low-level inferences from information in a text
      • use context clues to determine appropriate meanings of words
      • respond in writing to questions about a text with only minimal textual evidence
      • provide adequate textual evidence to support or develop ideas about a text
      • consistently apply basic word-level knowledge (e.g., synonyms)
      • demonstrate more than a minimal understanding of the text

      Proficient

      What proficient students likely can do that basic students likely cannot do:
      What proficient students likely cannot do:
      • pull appropriate details or information from across a text to summarize briefly or demonstrate a general understanding of the text
      • define words using contextual evidence
      • support a literal reading of a text with text-relevant information
      • recognize synonyms of grade-appropriate words and use synonyms to draw a simple conclusion
      • demonstrate a general, often literal, understanding of a literary or informational text
      • reason deductively when drawing conclusions or making inferences
      • read critically to evaluate text
      • demonstrate understanding of the complexities of a text

      Advanced

      What advanced students likely can do that proficient students likely cannot do:
      • apply deductive reasoning to draw conclusions and make inferences
      • provide appropriate and sufficient textual evidence to clarify effectively ideas in a text
      • read critically to evaluate text
      • recognize synonyms of both grade-level and above-grade-level words
      • synthesize ideas and information to uncover the complexities of a text
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Reading Grade 6

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • demonstrate a minimal to literal understanding of a grade-appropriate informational or literary text
      • respond to questions about a text with only minimal supporting textual evidence
      • apply basic understanding of narrative elements in a literary text (e.g., sequence, character relationships)
      • determine meanings of words in context
      • make simple predictions and draw simple conclusions based on information in a text
      • recognize a main idea and identify information not related to a main idea
      • apply basic word-level knowledge to identify word meaning and usage
      • recognize an organizational pattern in an informational text
      • apply understanding of author's choice of language to make meaning of text
      • provide adequate text-relevant information or evidence to support an idea or a conclusion about a text

      Proficient

      What proficient students likely can do that basic students likely cannot do:
      What proficient students likely cannot do:
      • demonstrate a general understanding of a literary or informational text
      • use textual evidence to draw conclusions about narrative elements in a literary text (e.g., mood, characters)
      • determine the meanings of words and expressions in context (e.g., idioms, common expressions, synonyms)
      • recognize an author's opinion in an informational text and determine the purpose of a text or portion of text
      • identify an organizational pattern of an informational text
      • provide some textual support for an idea of conclusion about a text
      • explain an organizational pattern of an informational text
      • recognize the implications of an author's specific language choices
      • extend ideas or information in a text in order to discover the text's complexities

      Advanced

      What advanced students likely can do that proficient students likely cannot do:
      • interpret effectively an author's choice of words and phrases
      • use effectively supporting evidence from a text to clarify or extend ideas
      • analyze and explain an organizational pattern of an informational text by using effective textual evidence
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Reading Grade 7

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • identify information directly stated in an informational or literary text
      • respond in writing to a question about a text with only minimal textual support
      • identify a main idea of an informational text or a theme of a literary text when that idea or theme is apparent
      • draw conclusions about characters in a literary text
      • recognize the implications of text features (e.g., bulleted list, illustration)
      • draw conclusions about characters in a literary text
      • recognize tone in a text
      • effectively use context clues to define words and phrases
      • move beyond a minimal understanding of literary elements (e.g., setting, characters)

      Proficient

      What proficient students likely can do that basic students likely cannot do:
      What proficient students likely cannot do:
      • demonstrate a general understanding of an informational or literary text
      • recognize an obvious tone in a text
      • determine the meanings of words in context
      • draw conclusions and make inferences about characters and character relationships in a literary text
      • articulate an understanding of setting as related to time and place
      • articulate a sophisticated understanding of a literary setting
      • analyze author's craft
      • clarify and extend ideas to explore the complexities of a text
      • use textual support effectively to explain ideas about a text

      Advanced

      What advanced students likely can do that proficient students likely cannot do:
      • interpret effectively an author's choice of words and phrases
      • use effectively supporting evidence from a text to clarify or extend ideas
      • analyze and explain an organizational pattern of an informational text by using effective textual evidence
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Reading Grade 8

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • identify information directly stated in the text
      • draw simple conclusions and make simple inferences from information in the text
      • apply basic summary and paraphrasing skills to grade-appropriate text
      • respond in writing to questions about a text with only minimal textual support
      • cite adequate textual evidence to support or explain ideas about a text
      • identify a main idea

      Proficient

      What proficient students likely can do that basic students likely cannot do:
      What proficient students likely cannot do:
      • draw conclusions about characters from their words and actions
      • identify a main idea
      • support ideas about text with appropriate textual evidence
      • demonstrate a general understanding of a literary or informational text (e.g., make inferences, draw conclusions)
      • use textual information effectively to clarify ideas in and about a text
      • analyze the implications of literary elements
      • analyze an author's use of language
      • demonstrate an understanding of the text beyond literal reading

      Advanced

      What advanced students likely can do that proficient students likely cannot do:
      • choose appropriate text effectively to clarify ideas
      • draw conclusions about multiple elements of both informational and literary texts (e.g., word meanings, comparison, poetic devices, implications of text features)
      • analyze narrative elements (e.g., relationships between characters, character traits, plot structure)
      • apply language skills (e.g., recognize synonyms, define words in context, analyze poetic language, determine tone)
      MSA Performance Level Standards for English

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • read a writing prompt and respond by attempting an organizational strategy and supplying minimal support and elaboration
      • apply basic capitalization and punctuation rules.
      • use sentence sense to combine two or three simple sentences logically
      • draw simple conclusions and inferences from grade-level text regarding main idea, plot, characterization, theme, and tone
      • provide evidence in writing that a minimal understanding of a text has been achieved
      • recognize structural features of a poem
      • read titles of on-line sources and predict usefulness of content for a given purpose
      • read and address a writing prompt by using an organizational structure and supplying adequate support and elaboration
      • internalize and apply a wide-range of language mechanics rules
      • apply sentence sense to combine multiple sentences, using effective subordination, coordination, and sequencing
      • make valid connections between ideas within or across texts
      • provide textual evidence in writing to verify a literal understanding of grade-appropriate text
      • draw simple inferences from images and figurative language
      • interpret poetry
      • use context clues to determine the meaning of unknown/above grade-level words
      • recognizing grammatical classifications of words using position, form, and function

      Proficient

      What Proficient students likely do:
      What Proficient students likely cannot do:
      • all of what a basic student can do, plus
      • read and address a writing prompt by using an organizational strategy, supplying adequate support and elaboration, and minimizing errors in language usage and conventions
      • apply a wide-range of internalized language mechanics
      • use a resource to apply standard English language usage and conventions
      • apply sentence sense to combine multiple sentences using effective subordination, coordination, and sequencing
      • make valid connections among ideas within a text and draw conclusions and inferences by synthesizing information
      • draw simple inferences from images and figurative language
      • interpret poetry
      • provide textual evidence in writing to verify that a literal understanding of a text has been achieved
      • use context clues to determine the meaning of unknown/above grade-level words
      • recognize distinctions between the denotative and connotative meanings of words and phrases
      • recognize grammatical classifications of words by position, form, and function
      • fulfill the demands of a writing prompt by using an effective organizational structure, providing relevant and complete support, exhibiting clear and/or purposeful word choice, and applying correct language usage and convention
      • expand sentences by correctly placing modifying details
      • analyze the connection between stylistic elements and author's purpose in poetry and grade-appropriate text
      • clarify and extend understanding of a text beyond the literal
      • provide in writing stated and implied evidence that affirms an understanding of the complexities of a text

      Advanced

      What Advanced students likely do:
      • all of what a proficient student can do, plus
      • fulfill the demands of a writing prompt by using an effective organizational structure, providing relevant and complete support, exhibiting clear and/or purposeful word choice, and applying correct English language usage and conventions
      • use specificity in word choice, details, and syntax to expand sentences effectively
      • analyze the connection between stylistic elements and author's purpose in poetry and grade-appropriate text
      • provide in writing stated and implied evidence that clarifies and extends understanding of a text beyond the literal and affirms an understanding of the complexities of a text
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Mathematics Grade 3

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • complete repeating patterns
      • identify congruent figures and lines of symmetry
      • read scales
      • interpret tables and bar graph
      • apply place-value concepts
      • add and subtract whole numbers
      • represent multiplication basic facts
      • write simple equations and simple inequalities
      • analyze properties of solid figures
      • interpret pictographs
      • determine value of mixed currency
      • represent division basic facts
      • communicate a partially developed understanding of problem solving using a strategy with little or no support

      Proficient

      What proficient students likely can do that basic students likely cannot do:
      What proficient students likely cannot do:
      • write simple equations and simple inequalities
      • analyze properties of solid figures
      • interpret pictographs
      • determine value of mixed currency
      • represent division basic facts
      • communicate a partially developed understanding of problem solving using a strategy with little or no support
      • analyze properties of plane geometric figures
      • analyze transformations
      • describe the probability of one simple event
      • communicate a comprehensive understanding of problem solving using a strategy with supporting connections

      Advanced

      What advanced students likely can do that proficient students likely cannot do:
      • analyze properties of plane geometric figures
      • analyze transformations
      • describe the probability of one simple event
      • communicate a comprehensive understanding of problem solving using a strategy with supporting connections
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Mathematics Grade 4

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • find the unknown factor in an equation
      • find perimeter
      • write simple fractions and decimals
      • multiply whole numbers
      • generalize a non-numeric pattern rule
      • write simple expressions using whole numbers
      • describe probability as a fraction
      • divide whole numbers
      • subtract decimals
      • estimate to find the sum
      • communicate a partially developed understanding of problem solving using a strategy with little or no support

      Proficient

      What proficient students likely can do that basic students likely cannot do:
      What proficient students likely cannot do:
      • generalize a non-numeric pattern rule
      • write simple expressions using whole numbers
      • describe probability as a fraction
      • divide whole numbers
      • subtract decimals
      • estimate to find the sum
      • communicate a partially developed understanding of problem solving using a strategy with little or no support
      • represent simple fractions on a number line
      • measure to the nearest quarter inch
      • convert inches to feet or yards
      • make a line plot
      • analyze data to find range and median
      • communicate a comprehensive understanding of problem solving using a strategy with supporting connections

      Advanced

      What advanced students likely can do that proficient students likely cannot do:
      • represent simple fractions on a number line
      • measure to the nearest quarter inch
      • convert inches to feet or yards
      • make a line plot
      • analyze data to find range and median
      • communicate a comprehensive understanding of problem solving using a strategy with supporting connections
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Mathematics Grade 5

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • locate whole numbers on a number line
      • evaluate expressions
      • identify similar figures
      • organize data
      • determine the probability of one simple event
      • compare decimals
      • interpret the rule for a one operation function table
      • solve simple equations
      • determine equivalent units of measurement
      • analyze data to interpret stem-and-leaf plots and read circle graphs
      • identify members of a sample space
      • apply knowledge of fractions and decimals
      • apply number relationships to prime and composite numbers and greatest common factor
      • communicate a partially developed understanding of problem solving using a strategy with little or no support

      Proficient

      What proficient students likely can do that basic students likely cannot do:
      What proficient students likely cannot do:
      • interpret the rule for a one operation function table
      • solve simple equations
      • determine equivalent units of measurement
      • analyze data to interpret stem-and-leaf plots and read circle graphs
      • identify members of a sample space
      • apply knowledge of fractions and decimals
      • apply number relationships to prime and composite numbers and greatest common factor
      • communicate a partially developed understanding of problem solving using a strategy with little or no support
      • analyze geometric relationships of plane geometric figures
      • estimate and apply formulas to determine perimeter and area
      • determine measures of central tendency
      • communicate a comprehensive understanding of problem solving using a strategy with supporting connections

      Advanced

      What advanced students likely can do that proficient students likely cannot do:
      • analyze geometric relationships of plane geometric figures
      • estimate and apply formulas to determine perimeter and area
      • determine measures of central tendency
      • communicate a comprehensive understanding of problem solving using a strategy with supporting connections
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Mathematics Grade 6

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • identify a rule for a one operation function table
      • identify plane geometric figures
      • organize data to make frequency tables
      • find percent of a number
      • represent integers
      • write a rule for a one operation function table
      • evaluate expressions
      • locate integers on a number line
      • identify on a graph a linear relationship that shows increase, decrease, and no change
      • classify triangles
      • compare radii and diameters
      • apply formulas to determine volume and area
      • apply knowledge of rational numbers
      • analyze number relationships.
      • communicate a partially developed understanding of problem solving using a strategy with little or no support

      Proficient

      What proficient students likely can do that basic students likely cannot do:
      What proficient students likely cannot do:
      • write a rule for a one operation function table
      • evaluate expressions
      • locate integers on a number line
      • identify on a graph a linear relationship that shows increase, decrease, and no change
      • classify triangles
      • compare radii and diameters
      • apply formulas to determine volume and area
      • apply knowledge of rational numbers
      • analyze number relationships.
      • communicate a partially developed understanding of problem solving using a strategy with little or no support
      • analyze linear relationships to identify graph of a line.
      • identify perpendicular bisectors.
      • apply formulas to determine area of a rectangle and a triangle
      • organize data to make a stem-and-leaf plot
      • represent whole numbers using exponential form using powers of 10
      • compare and order fractions
      • communicate a comprehensive understanding of problem solving using a strategy with supporting connections

      Advanced

      What advanced students likely can do that proficient students likely cannot do:
      • analyze linear relationships to identify graph of a line
      • identify perpendicular bisectors
      • apply formulas to determine area of a rectangle and a triangle
      • organize data to make a stem-and-leaf plot
      • represent whole numbers using exponential form using powers of 10
      • compare and order fractions
      • communicate a comprehensive understanding of problem solving using a strategy with supporting connections
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Mathematics Grade 7

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • identify simple expressions in context
      • apply the properties of congruent polygons
      • apply mean, median, and mode
      • identify a number written in exponential notation
      • write and evaluate simple expressions, solve simple equations, and write simple inequalities
      • locate points on a number line and a coordinate plane using rational numbers
      • identify and apply properties of various angles
      • determine best choice of a data display and organize data in a variety of displays
      • determine probability and express it as a decimal
      • compare and order decimals, fractions, percents and integers, and determine equivalent ratios
      • determine percent of another number
      • communicate a partially developed understanding of problem solving using a strategy with little or no support

      Proficient

      What proficient students likely can do that basic students likely cannot do:
      What proficient students likely cannot do:
      • write and evaluate simple expressions, solve simple equations, and write simple inequalities
      • locate points on a number line and a coordinate plane using rational numbers
      • identify and apply properties of various angles
      • determine best choice of a data display and organize data in a variety of displays
      • determine probability and express it as a decimal
      • compare and order decimals, fractions, percents and integers, and determine equivalent ratios
      • determine percent of another number
      • communicate a partially developed understanding of problem solving using a strategy with little or no support
      • evaluate algebraic expressions
      • identify in a table linear relationships that show increase, decrease, and no change
      • graph the solution to an inequality
      • draw a transformation on a coordinate plane
      • determine area of a trapezoid and surface area of a rectangular prism
      • use percents as rates to solve a problem
      • determine equivalent fractions, decimals, and numbers in exponential notation
      • communicate a comprehensive understanding of problem solving using a strategy with supporting connections

      Advanced

      What advanced students likely can do that proficient students likely cannot do:
      • evaluate algebraic expressions
      • identify in a table linear relationships that show increase, decrease, and no change
      • graph the solution to an inequality
      • draw a transformation on a coordinate plane
      • determine area of a trapezoid and surface area of a rectangular prism
      • use percents as rates to solve a problem
      • determine equivalent fractions, decimals, and numbers in exponential notation
      • communicate a comprehensive understanding of problem solving using a strategy with supporting connections
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Mathematics Grade 8

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • determine the nth term in recursive arithmetic sequences
      • identify data organized in a variety of data displays
      • determine length using a scale drawing
      • identify linear functions given a graph
      • write and simplify expressions, write and solve equations, and solve inequalities
      • identify properties of parallel lines cut by a transversal
      • apply the Pythagorean Theorem
      • determine square root of whole numbers
      • apply a variety of percents in context
      • communicate a partially developed understanding of problem solving using a strategy with little or no support

      Proficient

      What proficient students likely can do that basic students likely cannot do:
      What proficient students likely cannot do:
      • identify linear functions given a graph
      • write and simplify expressions, write and solve equations, and solve inequalities
      • identify properties of parallel lines cut by a transversal
      • apply the Pythagorean Theorem
      • determine square root of whole numbers
      • apply a variety of percents in context
      • communicate a partially developed understanding of problem solving using a strategy with little or no support
      • determine the nth term in recursive geometric sequences
      • determine circumference of a circle
      • organize and display data in a variety of data displays
      • analyze results of simulations
      • represent rational numbers in scientific notation
      • use proportional reasoning to solve problems
      • communicate a comprehensive understanding of problem solving using a strategy with supporting connections

      Advanced

      What advanced students likely can do that proficient students likely cannot do:
      • determine the nth term in recursive geometric sequences
      • determine circumference of a circle
      • organize and display data in a variety of data displays
      • analyze results of simulations
      • represent rational numbers in scientific notation
      • use proportional reasoning to solve problems
      • communicate a comprehensive understanding of problem solving using a strategy with supporting connections
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Algebra/Data Analysis

      Basic

      What basic students likely do:
      What basic students likely cannot do:
      • represent and extend a linear and geometric pattern
      • determine the sum of two matrices
      • write and solve an equation that models a real-world situation
      • determine the value of an equation or inequality for a given value of x
      • use the graph of a line of best fit to make a prediction
      • use a curve of best fit to describe the trend of the data
      • determine the experimental probability from a survey and a simulation
      • determine the value of a data point from the mean and the remaining data points
      • determine the mean of data in a stem and leaf plot and the median in a box and whisker plot
      • identify the maximum and minimum of the graph of a non-linear function
      • compare rate of increase/decrease between intervals of the graph of a non-linear function
      • use the results of a simulation to make a prediction
      • determine the theoretical probability of an event
      • determine the quartiles of a data set and create a box and whisker plot
      • identify representative sampling and simple random sampling
      • identify the graph of a system of equations
      • write and solve a system of equations that models a real-world situation
      • model a real-world situation with an algebraic expression that uses the sum or quotient
      • write the equation for a line of best fit
      • identify and use a curve of best fit and a line of best fit to describe data and make predictions
      • determine the difference between two matrices
      • recognize the misuse of data from a survey and a graph
      • determine the linear equation that models a function in a table

      Proficient

      What Proficient students likely do:
      What Proficient students likely cannot do:
      • use the results of a simulation to make a prediction
      • determine the theoretical probability of an event
      • determine the quartiles of a data set and create a box and whisker plot
      • identify representative sampling and simple random sampling
      • identify the graph of a system of equations
      • write and solve a system of equations that models a real-world situation
      • model a real-world situation with an algebraic expression that uses the sum or quotient
      • write the equation for a line of best fit
      • identify and use a curve of best fit and a line of best fit to describe data and make predictions
      • determine the difference between two matrices
      • recognize the misuse of data from a survey and a graph
      • determine the linear equation that models a function in a table
      • determine the range of a non-linear graph
      • write an inequality that models a real-world situation
      • extrapolate the value of a graph beyond the grid provided
      • explain and justify a system of equations and its solution that models a real-world situation
      • explain and justify the extension of a linear pattern beyond immediate next terms
      • justify the appropriate use of a curve of best fit to make a prediction
      • model a real-world situation with an algebraic expression that uses sum and product
      • multiply a matrix by a scalar and interpret the result
      • analyze stem and leaf plots to determine measures of central tendency
      • justify a sampling method as providing a representative sample

      Advanced

      What Advanced students likely do:
      • determine the range of a non-linear graph
      • write an inequality that models a real-world situation
      • extrapolate the value of a graph beyond the grid provided
      • explain and justify a system of equations and its solution that models a real-world situation
      • explain and justify the extension of a linear pattern beyond immediate next terms
      • justify the appropriate use of a curve of best fit to make a prediction
      • model a real-world situation with an algebraic expression that uses sum and product
      • multiply a matrix by a scalar and interpret the result
      • analyze stem and leaf plots to determine measures of central tendency
      • justify a sampling method as providing a representative sample
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Science Grade 5

      Basic

      Students at this level need more work to attain proficiency. They use minimal supporting evidence. Their responses provide little or no synthesis of information, such as data, cause-effect relationships, or other collected evidence with little or no use of scientific terminology.

      Proficient

      Students at this level have attained a realistic and rigorous measure of achievement. They use supporting evidence that is generally complete with some integration of scientific concepts, principles, and/or skills. Their responses reflect some synthesis of information, such as data, cause-effect relationships, or other collected evidence with accurate use of scientific terminology present in the responses.

      Advanced

      Students at this level have demonstrated outstanding accomplishment. They use scientific evidence to demonstrate a full integration of scientific concepts, principles, and/or skills. Their responses reflect a complete synthesis of information, such as data, cause-effect relationships, or other collected evidence with accurate use of scientific terminology to strengthen their responses.
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Science Grade 8

      Basic

      Students at this level need more work to attain proficiency. They use minimal supporting evidence. Their responses provide little or no synthesis of information, such as data, cause-effect relationships, or other collected evidence with little or no use of scientific terminology.

      Proficient

      Students at this level have attained a realistic and rigorous measure of achievement. They use supporting evidence that is generally complete with some integration of scientific concepts, principles, and/or skills. Their responses reflect some synthesis of information, such as data, cause-effect relationships, or other collected evidence with accurate use of scientific terminology present in the responses.

      Advanced

      Students at this level have demonstrated outstanding accomplishment. They use scientific evidence to demonstrate a full integration of scientific concepts, principles, and/or skills. Their responses reflect a complete synthesis of information, such as data, cause-effect relationships, or other collected evidence with accurate use of scientific terminology to strengthen their responses.
      MSA Performance Level Standards for Biology

      Basic

      Students at this level demonstrate a minimal understanding of biology concepts, principles, and/or skills. Student responses indicate limited synthesis of information and understanding of scientific terminology.

      Proficient

      Students at this level demonstrate a realistic and rigorous level of achievement by providing evidence of an understanding of biology concepts and the ability to use scientific evidence to generally integrate scientific concepts, principles, and/or skills. Student responses indicate some synthesis of information and understanding of scientific terminology.

      Advanced

      Students at this level demonstrate an exemplary level of achievement by providing evidence of a complete understanding of biology concepts and the ability to use scientific evidence to fully integrate scientific concepts, principles, and/or skills. Student responses indicate a complete synthesis of information and understanding of scientific terminology.

      Standards for the MFTs, Attendance Rate, and Dropout Rate were adopted in 1990.

      Priority Schools

      Priority Schools are 5 percent of all Title I schools that are the lowest achieving on MSA or Tier I or Tier II School Improvement 1003(g) Grant (SIG) schools. These schools have not reached adequate performance standards in reading and mathematics for the "all students" subgroup, not just for low-performing subgroup populations. Schools or local education agencies have the option to use one of the USDE approved "turnaround models" or they can develop their own measures to implement to improve the school. If a school chooses to use its own model it must address a number of turnaround principles including strong leadership, effective teachers and instruction, additional time for student learning, school instructional programs, a safe school environment, and family and community engagement. Priority Schools are identified every three years.

      Progress in Achieving English Language Proficiency Indicator

      The progress in achieving English language proficiency indicator includes one measure, the percentage of students making progress towards attaining English language proficiency as measured by growth on the MCAP ELP assessment (see the progress in achieving English language proficiency indicator table).

      The progress in achieving English language proficiency indicator will account for 10% of the total accountability score for all schools with at least 10 English learners who have:

      • A valid prior year MCAP ELP score and
      • A valid current year MCAP ELP score
      OR
      • For an English learner in their first year of identification as an EL, a valid current year MCAP ELP score that meets proficiency (a score of 4.5 or higher).

      Progress in Achieving English Language Proficiency Table: Measures

      Measure Description Points possible
      Progress toward English language proficiency Percentage of students making progress towards attaining English language proficiency as measured by growth on the MCAP ELP assessment Elementary/Midde/High: 10

      Maryland will use a proficiency level growth-to-target model to measure an English learner's (EL) progress toward English language proficiency. The growth-to-target model is based on the overall proficiency level earned on the MCAP for English language proficiency (see English language proficiency tables). English learners are considered to have met the target if their overall proficiency level shows growth by:

      Meeting the annual growth target (see annual growth targets table)
      Meeting the minimum growth expectation (see minimum growth expectation table)
      Earning a proficiency score of 4.5 or higher

      English Language Proficiency Table: Annual Growth Targets

      Table reads: An English learner (EL) scoring between a 1.0 and a 1.9 on the MCAP ELP in their first year of being identified as an EL is expected to score at least a 2.0 on the MCAP ELP in their second year under that status, score at least a 2.9 in their third year, a 4.1 in their fourth year, and a 4.5 in their fifth year. A score of 4.5 or higher means the student has met Maryland's proficiency target.
      Initial Year Proficiency Level (based on MCAP ELP) Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
      1.0-1.9 2.0 2.9 3.6 4.1 4.5
      2.0-2.9 2.9 3.6 4.1 4.5 ---
      3.0-3.9 3.7 4.2 4.5 --- ---
      4.0-4.4 4.3 4.5 --- --- ---
      4.5 or higher (proficiency goal met) --- --- --- --- ---

      English Language Proficiency Table: Minimum Growth Expectations

      Table reads: An English learner (EL) scoring a 1.0 on the MCAP ELP in their first year of being identified as an EL is expected to improve their score in the second year by at least 1.0 points, 0.9 points in their third year of EL status, 0.7 their fourth year, 0.5 in their fifth year, and 0.4 in their sixth year. If a student misses their annual growth target in years three, four, five, or six, that student could still met the English language proficiency goal by meeting their maximum growth expectation. For example is an EL student scores a 1.0 in their first year, and a 1.9 in their second year (0.9 growth) they will miss both their annual growth target and their maximum growth expectation because they did not increase their previous score by 1.0 points. In their third year, they could meet their maximum growth expectation by scoring a 2.8 (0.9 growth) in their third year even though they would miss their annual growth target.
      Initial Year Proficiency Level(based on MCAP ELP) Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
      1.0-1.9 1.0 0.9 0.7 0.5 0.4
      2.0-2.9 0.9 0.7 0.5 0.4 ---
      3.0-3.9 0.7 0.5 0.3 --- ---
      4.0-4.4 0.3 0.2 --- --- ---
      4.5 or higher (proficiency goal met) --- --- --- --- ---

      For more information about the progress in achieving English language proficiency indicator, visit: Maryland's Every Student Succeeds Act Plan

      Promotion Rate

      The Promotion rate reflects the percentage of students promoted during the school year. Students that advanced from one grade to a higher level are defined as promoted. Students receiving a Maryland High School Diploma and Certificate of Completion along with grades pre-kindergarten through grade 12 are included. The Promotion rate percentage is calculated by dividing the aggregate number of students promoted by the aggregate number of students enrolled as of the end of the school year. Summer promotions are included in the promotion rate percentage.

R

Readiness for Postsecondary Success Indicator

The readiness for postsecondary success indicator is designed for high school only. The indicator includes two measures, on-track in 9th grade and credit for completion of a well-rounded education (see readiness for postsecondary success indicator table).

The readiness for postsecondary success indicator will account for 10% of the total accountability score for high schools.

On-track in 9th grade
The on-track in 9th grade measure is the percentage of 9th grade students earning at least four credits in any of the following:

  • English language arts
  • mathematics
  • science
  • social studies
  • world language

The on-track in 9th grade measure will account for 5% of the total accountability score for high schools.

Credit for completion of a well-rounded curriculum
The credit for completion of a well-rounded curriculum measure is the percentage of students graduating from or exiting high school with a certificate of program completion who have achieved at least one of the following:

  • earned a score of 3 or higher on an Advanced Placement exam or a score of 4 or higher on an International Baccalaureate program exam
  • met a standard set by the College Board on the SAT exam
  • met a standard set by ACT on the ACT exam
  • earned credit for dual enrollment
  • met the University of Maryland entry requirements
  • completed a youth or other apprenticeship training program approved by the Maryland Apprenticeship Training Council
  • completed an industry certification aligned with and MSDE-approved CTE program and achieved CTE concentration level status or higher
  • completed an MSDE-approved CTE program
  • met a standard on the ASVAB exam
  • received the Seal of Biliteracy
  • for students who obtained a Maryland High School Certificate of Program Completion, entered the world of work though:
    • gainful employment
    • postsecondary education and training
    • supported employment
    • other services that are integrated in the community

The credit for completion of well-rounded curriculum will account for 5% of the total accountability score for high schools.

Readiness for Postsecondary Readiness Indicator Table: Measures

Measure Description Points possible
On-track for 9th grade Percentage of 9th graders earning at least four credits in a specific list of courses High: 5

Elementary/Middle: 0
Credit for completion of a well-rounded curriculum Percentage of students graduating or exiting with a certificate of program completion that have achieved at least one of the specific requirements High: 5

Elementary/Middle: 0

For more information about the readiness for postsecondary success indicator, visit: Maryland’s Every Student Succeeds Act Plan

Reward Schools

Reward Schools are recognized in two categories: Title I Highest Performing Reward Schools (Category 1) and Title I Highest Progress Reward Schools (Category 2).

Category 1 Schools

  • Title I Highest Performing Reward Schools will have met the AMOs for "all students" and all subgroups for two consecutive years and have a 10 percent or less achievement gap between “all students” and subgroups and the school is designated in Strand 1 or 2 for two consecutive years.
  • Of the schools that are considered Highest Performing Reward Schools, those that are additionally in the top 10 percent of all Title I schools, indicating the maximum amount of improvement in student performance on MSA tests from 2009-2013, will be designated as Distinguished Highest Performing Reward Schools.
  • In addition, if a Highest Performing Reward School has improved its "all students" performance by at least 10 percentage points and the school is made up of 50 percent or more economically disadvantaged students, it will receive the title of a Superlative Highest Performing Reward School.

Category 2 Schools

  • Highest Progress Reward Schools are those Title I schools that have significantly reduced the gap in achievement between the subgroups from 2009-2013. These schools must have made at least 10 percentage point gain in the "all students" and have a 10 percent or less gap between the performance of "all students" and that of any other performing subgroup.

S

Safe Harbor

If a school does not meet the annual performance targets for each subgroup, a provision called Safe Harbor still allows a school to make AYP if the school meets all performance targets in the aggregate, and the subgroup meets the other academic indicator; and the percentage of students achieving below the proficient level in that subgroup decreases by ten percent. Safe Harbor is calculated using the last two years of test administration data.

SAT

The SAT is an exam students take near the end of high school as they prepare to apply to college. Their score on the exam may help colleges determine if a student would be a good fit.

For more information about the SAT, visit
SAT

Scale Score

The scale score is the measurement of a student`s performance relative to different performance levels that have been identified by the state. These performance levels for MSA, MOD-MSA, and ALT-MSA are basic, proficient, and advanced. The scale score data is reported at the school, system, and state level as well as student level.

MSA scale scores range from 240 to 650. The scale scores for MSA reading, mathematics, and science are listed below by grade:

MSA Reading Scale Scores
  Scale Score for Proficient Scale Score for Advanced
Grade 3 388 456
Grade 4 371 437
Grade 5 384 425
Grade 6 381 421
Grade 7 385 425
Grade 8 391 425
English 396 429

 

MSA Mathematics Scale Scores
  Scale Score for Proficient Scale Score for Advanced
Grade 3 379 441
Grade 4 374 433
Grade 5 392 453
Grade 6 396 447
Grade 7 396 451
Grade 8 407 444
Algebra 412 450

 

MSA Science Scale Scores
  Scale Score for Proficient Scale Score for Advanced
Grade 5 391 467
Grade 8 387 478
Biology 400 452

Beginning in the 2012-2013 school year the Mod-MSA was discontinued and those students are taking the MSA. MOD-MSA scale scores are not the same scores that are used to determine proficiency on the regular MSA in reading and mathematics for Grades 3 through 8. The MOD-MSA assesses the same content as the regular MSA but was designed with test items that are less complex and more accessible for a student with disabilities. Therefore, the modified assessments are different tests with separate standards and a different scale.

MOD-MSA scale scores range from 2 to 98. The scale scores for MOD-MSA reading and mathematics are listed below by grade:

MOD-MSA Reading Scale Scores
  Scale Score for Proficient Scale Score for Advanced
Grade 3 54 64
Grade 4 53 65
Grade 5 53 69
Grade 6 54 67
Grade 7 56 72
Grade 8 54 66

 

MOD-MSA Mathematics Scale Scores
  Scale Score for Proficient Scale Score for Advanced
Grade 3 54 66
Grade 4 53 67
Grade 5 54 70
Grade 6 56 69
Grade 7 54 71
Grade 8 60 73

The scale scores for ALT-MSA reading, mathematics and science are listed below by grade:


ALT-MSA Reading and Mathmatics Scale Scores
  Percent of Objectives Mastered Proficient Percent of Objectives Mastered Advanced
Grade 3 60 90
Grade 4 60 90
Grade 5 60 90
Grade 6 60 90
Grade 7 60 90
Grade 8 60 90
Grade 10 60 90

 

ALT-MSA Science Scale Scores
  Percent of Objectives Mastered Proficient Percent of Objectives Mastered Advanced
Grade 5 60 90
Grade 8 60 90
Grade 10 60 90

School Quality or Student Success Indicator

The school quality or student success (SQSS) indicator includes three measures: chronic absenteeism, school climate, and access to a well-rounded education. Access to well-rounded education has grade specific components (see the school quality or student success indicator table).

The school quality or student success indicator will account for 35% of the total accountability score for all schools.

Chronic absenteeism
The chronic absenteeism measure identifies the number of students who are expected to attend school for at least 10 days and who were absent 10% or more of the school days while enrolled at that school. For example, a student who is registered to attend a school for 30 days and who is absent 3 of those 30 days is considered chronically absent.

A student can be counted as chronically absent in multiple schools within the state in the same year. This can occur when a student who is enrolled for in a school for at least 10 days and is chronically absent moves and enrolls in another school for at least 10 days and is chronically absent.

The chronic absenteeism measure will account for 15% of the total accountability score for all schools.

Access to a well-rounded education
The access to a well-rounded education measure has three components that are based on grade span:

Elementary schools: The percentage of 5th graders enrolled in science, social studies, fine arts, physical education, and health

Middle schools: The percentage of 8th grade students enrolled in fine arts, physical education, health, and computational learning

High schools: The percentage of graduating students or students exiting high school with a certificate of program completion who met at least one of the following criteria during high school (grades 9-12):

  • enrolled in an Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate course,
  • participated in dual enrollment, or
  • enrolled in state-approved career and technical education (CTE) program at the CTE concentrator level or higher

For students pursuing a certificate of program completion, enrollment in a general education course meets the requirement for access to a well-rounded education.

The access to a well-rounded education measure will account for 10% of the total accountability score for all schools.

School Quality or Student Success Indicator Table: Measures and components

Measure Component Description Points possible
Chronic absenteeism N/A Percentage of students who missed 10% of the school days or more from a school in which they were enrolled for 10 or more days Elementary/Middle/High: 15
School climate N/A Aggregate score from the Maryland State School Survey for students and educators Elementary/Middle/High: 10
Access to a well-rounded curriculum Elementary Percentage of 5th graders enrolled in science, social studies, fine arts, physical education, and health Elementary:10

Middle/High: 0
Middle Percentage of 8th graders enrolled in fine arts, physical education, health, and computational learning Middle:10

Elementary/High: 0
High Percentage of high school graduates who participate in at least one of the following: AP or IB, dual enrollment, or a MSDE-approved CTE course. Enrollment in a general education course meets the requirement for access to a well-rounded education for students pursuing a certificate of program completion High: 10

Elemenary/Middle: 0

For more information about the school quality or student success indicator, visit: Maryland's Every Student Succeeds Act Plan

Science

Science, or the Maryland Integrated Science Assessment (MISA), is administered to all students in fifth grade, eighth grade, and high school every spring. MISA replaced the Maryland School Assessment (MSA) in science for grades 5 and 8 in 2016 and was field tested for high school in 2018.

Information about the grades 5 and 8 tests
The test is made up of four "units." In each of the first three units, students read information about three separate phenomena and answer questions about each. One of those questions is a constructed response item, and the other questions will be a combination of multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, matching, and other technology-enabled items. The fourth unit will include one task similar to those in units 1-3 and one extended task that may include a simulation.

Information about the high school test
The High School Maryland Integrated Science Assessment (HS MISA) will consist of five sessions. In each of the sessions, students will read information about two separate phenomena and respond to questions about each. One of those questions will be a constructed response item, and the other questions will be a combination of selected response, fill-in-the-blank, matching, and other technology-enabled items.

For more information about the social studies assessment, visit
Maryland Assessments
School Improvement in Maryland

Social Studies

The social studies assessment is given as an end-of-course test for students who take Government in high school. The test consists of both selected response items and constructed response items. The constructed response items require students to write rather than select an appropriate response.

For more information about the social studies assessment, visit
Maryland Assessments
School Improvement in Maryland

Special Education

The number and percentage of special education program participants - students with disabilities who have current Individualized Education Plans (IEPs). The counts are reported as of the student's last dayof enrollment in the school system - either the last day in school or the date the student withdrew. The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of special education students by the June net enrollment.

Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.
Reported since November 1991: School level.

Special Services: Free/Reduced Price Meals

The number and percentage of students whose applications for free/reduced price meals meet the family size and income guidelines (as promulgated annually by the U.S. Department of Agriculture) and students approved through direct certification. The counts are reported as of the student`s last day of enrollment in the school system - either the last day in school or the date the student withdrew. The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of students receiving free or reduced price meals by the June net enrollment.

Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.
Reported since November 1991: School level.

Special Services: LEP Program Participants

The number and percentage of students assessed as eligible for the Limited English Proficient (LEP) Program. LEP is also referred to as English as a Second Language (ESL).

LEP students have a primary or home language other than English and have been assessed as having limited or no ability to understand, speak, read, or write English. The counts are reported as of the student`s last day of enrollment in the school system - either the last day in school or the date the student withdrew. The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of LEP students by the June net enrollment.

Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.
Reported since November 1991: School level.

LEP Exempt

Limited English Proficient students, during their first year of enrollment in U.S. schools, have the option of taking or not taking (exempt from) the state reading assessment. LEP students also have the option of taking or not taking (exempt from) the state mathematics assessment with accommodations as appropriate. States can but are not required to include these results in Adequate Yearly Progress. Students would be counted as participants for Adequate Yearly Progress purposes for the 95 percent testing requirement.

Redesignated Limited English Proficient (R-LEP)

These are students that exit the LEP subgroup once they attain English language proficiency. For Adequate Yearly Progress calculations, states have two years to include in the LEP subgroup students who have attained English proficiency.

Special Services: Special Education Program Participants

The number and percentage of special education program participants - students with disabilities who have current Individualized Education Plans (IEPs). The counts are reported as of the student`s last dayof enrollment in the school system - either the last day in school or the date the student withdrew. The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of special education students by the June net enrollment.

Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.
Reported since November 1991: School level.

Special Services: Title I Program Participants

The number and percentage of students receiving Title I services of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) (the Hawkins-Stafford Amendments of 1988). In schools with targeted assistance programs, only students receiving Title I services are counted. In schools with school wide programs, all students enrolled are counted. Students enrolled in any school receiving only State Compensatory Education (SCE) funding are not included in this count. The counts are reported as of the student`s last day of enrollment in the school system - either the last day in school or the date the student withdrew. The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of Title I students by the June net enrollment.

Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.
Reported since November 1991: School level.

State NAEP Sampling and Participation Rate

In state assessments (mathematics, reading, science, and writing), a sample of schools and students is selected to represent each participating state. In an average state, 2,500 students in approximately 100 public schools are assessed per grade, for each subject assessed. The selection process for schools uses stratified random sampling within categories of schools with similar characteristics. Some schools or groups of schools (districts) may be selected for each assessment cycle if they are unique in the state.

Typically, 30 students per grade per subject are selected randomly in each school. Some of the students who are randomly selected may be classified as students with disabilities (SD) or as English language learners (ELL).

Student Mobility

Student mobility is the percentage of students that either enter or withdraw from a school during the school year. To calculate student mobility, the number of entrants is added to the number of withdrawals and that sum is divided by the average daily student enrollment.

Students Absent Fewer Than 5 Days

The fewer than five days absent rate is the percentage of students in the school, county, or state who were absent between zero and four days and who were registered to attend a single school, one or more schools in a county, or one or more schools in Maryland for at least 90 days.

Students Absent More Than 20 Days

The more than 20 days absent rate is the percentage of students in the school, county, or state who were absent 21 school days or more and who were registered to attend a single school, one or more schools in a county, or one or more schools in Maryland for at least 90 days.

For more information about absentee rates, visit:
Maryland’s Every Student Succeeds Act Plan

T

Teacher Qualifications in Maryland

There are 3 professional certificates available in Maryland:

Standard Professional Certificate I and II
Teachers teaching a core academic subject (reading, mathematics, writing) must hold a valid certificate to teach in Maryland.

The Standard Professional Certificate I is issued to an applicant who meets all certification requirements and is employed by a Maryland local school system or an accredited non-public school.

The Standard Professional Certificate II requires 3 years of satisfactory, professional school-related experience plus 6 hours of acceptable credit and a professional development plan for the Advanced Professional Certificate.

Advanced Professional Certificate
Requires verification of 3 years of full-time professional school-related experience, 6 semester hours of acceptable credit; and a master’s degree, or a minimum of 36 semester hours of post baccalaureate course work which must include at least 21 hours of graduate credit. (The remaining 15 semester hours may include graduate or undergraduate course work and/or Maryland State Department of Education Continuing Professional Development (CPD) credits, or obtained National Board Certification and earned a minimum of 12 semester hours of approved graduate course work earned after the conferral of the bachelor degree.

Resident Teacher Certificate
Issued to an applicant who has been selected by a local school system in a specialized program.

Conditional Certificate
Issued only at the request of a local school system superintendent to an applicant employed in a local school system who does not meet all certification requirements.

The teacher totals reflected in each of these categories, are the number of teachers with credentials teaching core academic subjects as defined by the Federal government. These subjects are English, Reading or Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Foreign Languages, Civic and Government, Economics, Arts, History and Geography. Teachers teaching other subjects are not in these totals.

Testing Eligible

All students are tested and all of their scores are included in the scores that are reported at the school, system, and state levels. Not all student scores count for School Progress.

  • All students enrolled for a full academic year in grades 3 through 8 count for School Progress at the school, system and state levels. This includes students with no or limited English proficiency, students with disabilities taking MSA or Alt-MSA, and students absent during testing who do not make up the test.
  • Students moving among schools in grades 3 through 8 in the same school system count for School Progress at the school system and state levels.
  • Students in grades 3 through 8 moving among school systems count for School Progress at the state level.
  • Students moving among states do not count for School Progress at any level.

If the minimum subgroup size (N) is not met then it is not checked for School Progress. For reading and math performance, N=5 students. For participation, N=30 students for schools with one grade tested, 60 for schools with two or more grades tested, and 60 for local school systems.

Title I

The number and percentage of students receiving Title I services of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) (the Hawkins-Stafford Amendments of 1988). In schools with targeted assistance programs, only students receiving Title I services are counted. In schools with school wide programs, all students enrolled are counted. Students enrolled in any school receiving only State Compensatory Education (SCE) funding are not included in this count. The counts are reported as of the student's last day of enrollment in the school system - either the last day in school or the date the student withdrew. The percentage is calculated by dividing the number of Title I students by the June net enrollment.

Reported since November 1990: System and State levels.
Reported since November 1991: School level.

W

Weighted Averages for School Progress

Grade level scores for the MSA will be reported and disaggregated for all students who took the test. For purposes of School Progress, the grade level scores of students who count for School Progress will be combined to create one subject score for the school. The average will be weighted according to the number of students in each grade. For example, in a school with 25 third-graders and 50 fifth-graders, the third grade reading score would count for one-third of the school reading score, the fifth grade would count for two-thirds.

Withdrawals

Student withdrawals is the number of students transferring out of or withdrawing from a school for any reason during the September to June school year.